Contact Information

Registrar

2 Convent Road
Santa Rita Hall, 2nd Floor
Morristown, NJ 07960-6989

Phone: (973) 290-4460
Fax: (973) 290-4499

Office Hours:

Spring 2014:
Mon-Thur 8:30am-6:00pm
Fri 8:30am-4:30pm

General Education Requirements

General Education for Students prior to 2012
General Education for Students for Class of 2016

  • CSE Essentials General Education Program

    General Education is an essential facet of the Baccalaureate Degree, and it is an important influence on both the personal and the intellectual development of every student. General Education should reflect how the College's mission shapes the core of the program, and how mission effectiveness is realized. As a Catholic institution, the College of Saint Elizabeth is called to recognize its Catholic heritage and how student life and campus ministry enter into the learning experience. These objectives are described in A United Endeavor, 2009 Project on General Education & Mission for Catholic Colleges and Universities.

    "Institution values, the intellectual traditions or guiding principles" are also the criteria outlined by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U, 2005) for the shaping of a general education curriculum. For higher education in the 21st century, ensuring that the development of "intentional learners" is shaped by the goals of the institution serves as the cornerstone of this effort.

    Of equal significance, the Association of American Colleges and Universities identifies four Essential Learning Outcomes that higher education must address in order to provide students with what they need for life-long success in an increasingly multifaceted world: 1. Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World, 2. Intellectual and Practical Skills, 3. Personal and Social Responsibility, and 4. Integrative Learning. (AAC&U 20009) According to the AAC&U, "narrow learning is not enough":

    In an economy where every industry … is challenged to innovate or be displaced, all students need the kind of intellectual skills and capacities that enable them to get things done in the world … In a democracy that is diverse, globally engaged, and dependent on citizen responsibility, all students need an informed concern for the larger good … In a world of daunting complexity, all students need practices that require them to practice skills and integrate and apply their learning to challenging questions and real-world problems. (AAC&U 2012)

    Rooted in the College's Mission and Values, the CSE Essentials General Education Program therefore consists of clearly defined student learning outcomes, and a highly focused integrative curriculum that engenders in students exactly what they need for success: foundational skills, an understanding of global perspectives, different ways of knowing, and healthy living, the development of ethical empowerment and social responsibility, and that capacity to make vital connections which lies at the heart of genuine wisdom.

    MISSION AND GENERAL DESCRIPTION

    The CSE Essentials General Education Program at the College of Saint Elizabeth seeks to introduce students to the College's community of learning through engagement with a curriculum and co-curricular activities that are intentional, developmental, integrated and mission-driven.

    The CSE Essentials General Education Program at the College of Saint Elizabeth provides students with a breadth of academic competencies, skills for personal enrichment, and the desire for life-long learning.

    Firmly grounded in the Catholic liberal arts tradition, the CSE Essentials General Education Program prepares students to meet the challenges of a carefully considered life in a diverse and interdependent world. Above all, the CSE Essentials General Education Program provides students with a foundation in the knowledge, skills, and experiences that are necessary to think critically, communicate effectively, and act ethically. Through the CSE Essentials General Education Program, students will learn about themselves as well as the spiritual, natural, social, ethical, and aesthetic worlds around them.

    The CSE Essentials General Education Program provides a unique curriculum composed of four Elements. Courses in Element I use an integrated learning community format designed to provide foundational academic skills essential for student success in college, career, and life. Building on Element I, courses in Element II are team-taught in order to provide students with inter/multi-disciplinary perspectives on different ways of knowing.

    Courses in Element III engage students in a meaningful service-learning activity that is core to the Vincentian mission of the College. Service-learning is a course-based educational process combining engagement in the community and guided reflection designed to raise awareness of social problems and their root causes. Courses in Element III emphasize faith, spirituality, and ethics. Element IV is a Capstone Seminar course designed to provide students with the opportunity to reflect on, and integrate their whole CSE Essentials learning experience.

    TOTAL CREDITS

    Element I requires students to complete 12-18 credits for the literacy component.* Element II requires the student to complete three 4-credit courses for a total of 12 credits. Element III and Element IV both require students to complete one 4-credit course. Total credits for the CSE Essentials General Education Program is 32-38 credits.

    *Variations in total General Education credit may occur. Students completing Foundations in Literacy as a prerequisite to the literacy component will need to complete 38 credits. Other adjustments to the total General Education requirements are listed under Element I and Element II.

  • CSE Essentials – Student Learning Outcomes

    PURPOSE

    The CSE Essentials General Education Program at the College of Saint Elizabeth is designed as a purposeful general education experience that is to be intentional, developmental and mission-driven. Skills and knowledge derived from general education and the major can be incorporated into an effective undergraduate education guided by the educational philosophy of the College.

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    The general education student learning outcomes focus on the indispensable knowledge, skills and experiences that enable students to think critically, communicate effectively, make crucial connections between multiple perspectives, and act ethically. They will not only provide students with the means to be successful in their chosen field, but also for life-long learning, shaping the expected competencies of a CSE graduate by the time of graduation.

    ELEMENT I - Foundational Skills―Freshman/Sophomore Year: Two to Three 6-credit Courses and Five Student Learning Outcomes

    1.1. The ability to think critically

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 1.1a. Identify a problem and approach it from multiple perspectives.
    • 1.1b. Articulate differences between points of view.
    • 1.1c. Interpret evidence.
    • 1.1d. Synthesize information, arguments, and perspectives in order to create new meaning, insight, and understanding.
    • 1.1e. Engage in on-going reflection about context, point of view, assumptions, information, and outcomes in order to generate new, deeper, more challenging questions.
    • 1.1f. Demonstrate precepts of valid, sound, and cogent reasoning.

    1.2. The ability to communicate effectively

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 1.2a. Demonstrate the ability to understand and evaluate both written and oral presentations of material.
    • 1.2b. Accurately listen to, paraphrase, and reflect on arguments, opinions, and feelings of others.
    • 1.2c. Argue positions cogently and skillfully, both orally and in writing.
    • 1.2d. Write clear, organized essays and papers that demonstrate proficiency in the conventions of academic American English.

    1.3. An understanding of and competency in information literacy

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 1.3a. Demonstrate effective research skills.
    • 1.3b. Locate and evaluate information from sources, both electronic and traditional.
    • 1.3c. Summarize and interpret multiple forms of information.
    • 1.3d. Use information in ways that align with the ethical social, and legal obligations of scholarship.

    1.4. A facility with technology and software

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 1.4a. Use software to help analyze and solve problems.
    • 1.4b. Utilize software and technology as a tool for research and problem solving.
    • 1.4c. Comprehend the breadth and the limitations of software and technology as tools for learning.
    • 1.4d. Use appropriate software and technology for presenting information graphically, and for organizing and presenting various forms of data reports.

    1.5 The ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations. This is fulfilled by taking a math course related to the major or a specific course in Element II.

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 1.5a. Demonstrate basic mathematical and computational skills.
    • 1.5b. Demonstrate the ability to organize and interpret qualitative and quantitative data.

    ELEMENT II – Inter/Multidisciplinary Content and Perspectives – Sophomore and Junior Year: Three 4-credit courses, One Course to Address Outcome 2.1, a Second Course to Address Outcome 2.2, and a Third Course to Address Outcome 2.3

    2.1 A global perspective on world events

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 2.1a. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of world geography and its implications for history, culture, and language.
    • 2.1b. Explore how such factors as culture, religion, race, socioeconomic status, and philosophical beliefs influence interpretations of world events and possible solutions.
    • 2.1c. Demonstrate knowledge of local, national, and international political issues and events.
    • 2.1d. Assess information that influences political choices and action at home and in the global community.
    • 2.1e. Evaluate the impact of technology and scientific advances on the human condition.

    2.2 An acquaintance with languages, practices, and relationships between and among the arts, humanities, and sciences.

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 2.2a. Examine questions about human experience as they are expressed in the humanities.
    • 2.2b. Understand how the arts express the human experience.
    • 2.2c. Use scientific reasoning as a method of investigation.
    • 2.2d. Examine social issues from a variety of viewpoints.
    • 2.2e. Recognize how distinct areas of study can be integrated with other disciplines to solve problems and enhance our understanding of the world.

      Courses meeting the math requirement will have two additional Student Learning Outcomes:

    • 2.2f. Demonstrate basic mathematical and computational skills.
    • 2.2g. Demonstrate the ability to organize and interpret qualitative and quantitative data.

    2.3 The necessary knowledge and the ability to live a healthier life.

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 2.3a. Demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of emotionally healthy persons and interpersonal relationships.
    • 2.3b. Demonstrate the capacity for self-reflection and the ability to understand the perspective of others.
    • 2.3c. Participate effectively in groups, contributing positively and managing conflict.
    • 2.3d. Seek appropriate assistance, mentoring, and feedback as catalysts for personal growth.
    • 2.3e. Demonstrate an understanding of choices proven to contribute to ongoing physical health and the ability to act accordingly.

    ELEMENT III – Faith, Spirituality, Ethics and Service Learning – Junior Year: One 4-credit Course with Aligned Service Learning to address the following Three Student Learning Outcomes

    3.1. An understanding of faith and spirituality, and an appreciation for their significance within the human community

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 3.1a. Understand faith and spirituality both as matters for intellectual reflection and as styles of life that offer structures, self-awareness, and depth of experience to individuals and communities.
    • 3.1b. Interpret multiple facets of faith and spirituality, including sources of tradition and beliefs and experiences of God and the Sacred.
    • 3.1c. Understand different religious and non-religious perspectives on issues central to faith and spirituality.

    3.2. The ability and the desire to act ethically

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 3.2a. Understand the distinction between descriptive and normative ethics.
    • 3.2b. Interpret ethical ideals in light of their relationship to religious and non-religious systems of thought.
    • 3.2c. Evaluate her/his own ethical ideals in light of alternate ethical visions.
    • 3.2d. Distinguish the integrity of "wholeness" of individuals and communities in different geographical, cultural, social, economic, linguistic, and religious contexts.
    • 3.2e. Construct an intentional style of interacting with others, one that fosters her/his own unique disposition while affirming that of the other.
    • 3.2f. Meets her/his own needs in ways that do not impinge on the rights or needs or others.

    3.3. An appreciation for the value of service and responsibility to the human community and the environment

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 3.3a. Demonstrate an understanding of the Vincentian tradition of service.
    • 3.3b. Reflect upon the relationships between and among service to others, greater societal issues, and personal growth.
    • 3.3c. Demonstrate an understanding of choices that positively impact the environment and the ability to act accordingly.

    ELEMENT IV – Capstone Seminar – Senior Year: One 4-credit Seminar Course to address the following Student Learning Outcome

    4.1 An integration of knowledge and approaches from the various disciplines, from making simple connections among ideas and experiences to synthesizing and transferring learning to new, complex situations within and beyond the campus.

    Criteria

    Students are able to:

    • 4.1a. Reflect on General Education learning experiences in relation to life-long learning.
    • 4.1b. Examine the ethical implications of contemporary issue(s) by applying knowledge from various disciplines.
    • 4.1c. Explore the deepest questions about life.
    • 4.1d. Develop common ground among different points of view.

  • Summary of CSE Essentials Course Requirements and Credits

    ELEMENT I: Freshmen/Sophomore Level

    • CSE100: Foundations in Literacy (6*)
    • CSE110: Integrated Literacy I (6)
    • CSE120: Integrated Literacy II (6)

    ELEMENT II: Sophomore/Junior Level

    • CSE210: Global Perspectives (4)
    • CSE220: Ways of Knowing (4)
    • CSE230: Healthy Living (4)

    ELEMENT III: Junior Level

    One of:

    • CSE300/300SL Faith, Spirituality, and Ethics I (4) or
    • CSE310 Faith, Spirituality, and Ethics II (4) (with 310SL or other "SL" Designated Course)

    ELEMENT IV: Senior Level

    • CSE400: Essentials Capstone Seminar (4)

    Total: 32-38 credits

    *Students can place out of this course.
  • Detailed Description of the Four Elements of CSE Essentials

    Element I

    Element I is rooted in the pedagogy of integrated learning and contextual skills instruction. It centers on a series of integrated learning communities designed to provide foundational academic skills, as well as co-curricular workshops and experiences essential for student success both in college, and in life. Courses taught in Element I provide activities for students to master these skills, and to obtain such experiences early in their academic careers. Element I requires that the skills would be introduced and practiced during this part of the Gen Ed Experience in the context of one or more content-area courses.

    Based on their respective writing placement, students therefore learn about, and develop foundational academic skills contextually, i.e., in the context of content-area instruction and co-curricular experiences. A key focus is the opportunity for students to begin learning about Mission and Values, as well as Student Life through co-curricular integration.

    As seen, there are five outcomes to be met in Element I:

    • 1.1. The ability to think critically
    • 1.2. The ability to communicate effectively
    • 1.3. An understanding of and competency in information literacy
    • 1.4. A facility with technology and software
    • 1.5. The ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations

    The Element I model design links "who our students" are (Women's College, Continuing Studies and transfer students) and how our students can meet all the requirements for Element I. Depending on individual student placement, Element I would be a total of 12-18 credits, or 4 credits for some transfers and continuing studies students.

    The Literacy component of Element I will be comprised of three "Learning Communities": 1) Integrated Literacy, 2) Content-Area Instruction, and 3) Mission and Values/Student Life Experiences. Element I will be composed of three sections: A. Foundations in Literacy which is designed for the students who specifically need enrichment in the literacy skill sets; Sections B and C: Literacy One and Two are designed for all students and will follow in sequence. The Element I model also includes a Quantitative Problem-Solving (D). Element I courses will generally have a maximum enrollment of 15 students. Each component of Element I is described below in more detail.

    Literacy Component:

    A. Foundations in Literacy

    • Two Instructors – a writing specialist & content-area specialist collaborating
    • Where possible, one instructor will also be a First Year Advisor
    • An integrated learning community for:
      • Developmentally structured contextual Expository Writing/Literacy instruction that content-area instruction follows
      • Integrated workshops/training on foundational Mission and Values, Student Life, (i.e., leadership, diversity, and relationships), as well as on foundational presentation skills, information literacy, and technology and software.
      • Contextual Study Skills instruction and start of ePortfolio
      • Where applicable, Academic Advising
      • Aligned with 1-2 co-curricular First Year events related to Mission and Values, and Student Life. Faculty, along with Mission and Values and Student Life representatives, will work collaboratively in this effort
      • Determined by student's writing assessment/placement: Basic Writing
      • 6 credits (3 content – 150 minutes/week and 3 credits writing – 200 minutes/week)
      • Students can test out of this

    B. Integrated Literacy I

    • Two Instructors – a writing specialist & content-area specialist collaborating
    • Where possible, one instructor is also a First Year Advisor
    • An integrated learning community for:
      • Developmentally structured contextual Argument Writing/Literacy instruction that content-area instruction follows
      • Integrated workshops/training on emerging Mission and Values, Student Life, (i.e., leadership, diversity, and relationships), as well as on emerging presentation skills, information literacy, technology and software, and foundational informal logic/generalized critical thinking
      • Contextual Study skills instruction and start/continuation of ePortfolio
      • Where applicable, Academic Advising
      • Aligned with co-curricular First Year events related to Mission and Values, and Student Life. Faculty, along with Mission and Values and Student Life representatives, will work collaboratively in this effort
      • 6 credits (3 content – 150 minutes/week, and 3 credits writing – 200 minutes/week)
      • Students cannot test out of this

    C. Integrated Literacy II

    • Two Instructors – a writing specialist & content-area specialist collaborating
    • An integrated learning community for:
      • Contextual Research Writing and Advanced Information Literacy
      • Integrated workshops and training on Intermediate Mission and Values, Student Life, (i.e., leadership, diversity, and relationships), as well as intermediate presentation skills, information literacy, technology and software, and emerging informal logic/generalized critical thinking
      • Contextual Study Skills instruction and start/continuation of ePortfolio
      • Content-area instruction in the student's major or Area
      • Aligned with a co-curricular First Year events related to Mission and Values, and Student Life. Faculty, along with Mission and Values and Student Life representatives, will work collaboratively in this effort
      • 6 credits (3 content – 150 minutes/week and 3 credits writing – 200 minutes/week)
      • Students cannot test out of this.

    Math Component: Quantitative Problem-solving

    D. Quantitative Problem-solving

    • Students must pass, test out of, or be exempt from Basic Skills Math
    • Basic Skills Math instruction will be contextual, not discrete
    • Students with majors in Science and Math, Human and Social Development, or Health and Human Services Areas that require taking at least one more college Mathematics class (e.g. Math 119, 145, 149, etc.) need not take additional math.
    • Students with majors in Culture and Humanities or Human and Social Development that do not require any math, will need to take a designated Element II course that includes a substantive quantitative problem-solving component, or one discrete non-major math course as an open-elective.
    • It will be the prerogative of the Mathematics and Computer Science Program to determine the standards for courses that meet the quantitative problem-solving goal and related outcomes
    • Credit is applied through the various options described above.

    Summary of Element I

    • Students take two to three Integrated Literacy courses based on writing placement.
    • Students meet the quantitative problem-solving requirement upon completion of meeting the Contextual Basic Skills Math plus successful completion one of the following pathways: 1) a substantive college-level math class from their major, 2) a designated Element II course meeting the quantitative math criteria, or 3) an open-elective math course that meets the quantitative math student learning outcomes.
    • Total credits for Element I will be 12 credits (two literacy course sections) to 18 credits (three literacy course sections).

    Element I: Women's College Credit and Sequence Policy

    • Women's College students who begin college at CSE must complete Element I Integrated Literacy sequence at CSE.
    • Women's College transfer students who have not completed English Comp I and/or II elsewhere must take the Element I Integrated Literacy sequence at CSE.
    • Transfer students who completed English Comp I and/or II elsewhere must take a Literacy or Writing Seminar that orients them within the General Education Program, and determines what outcomes they still need to meet. The course will be writing intensive, and will integrate workshops and training in Mission and Values, student life, information literacy, and communication and critical thinking skills.

    Element I: Continuing Studies Credit and Sequence Policy

    • Continuing studies students who transfer in English Comp I and/or II must take a Literacy Seminar that orients them within the General Education Program, and determines what learning outcomes they still need to meet. The course will be writing intensive, and will integrate workshops and training in Mission and Values, student life, information literacy and communication and critical thinking skills. Students entering with an Associates Degree and second degree students will be exempt from this requirement, but such students must complete Element III.
    • When necessary, and with approval from the Director of General Education, Continuing Studies students may take English Comp I and/or II at another institution for credit at CSE. These students must still take the Literacy or Writing Seminar that orients them within the General Education Program, and determines what learning outcomes they still need to meet. The course will be writing intensive, and will integrate workshops and training in Mission and Values, student life, information literacy and communication and critical thinking skills.

    Element II

    Building on the foundational academic skills from Element I, students have the opportunity to explore a breadth of knowledge across the disciplines in Element II. Element II consists of three four-credit courses. Students take one course focusing on global perspectives, another course on the interrelationships between the liberal arts and sciences, (ways of knowing), and a third course on healthy life styles.

    As seen, Element II courses would be courses focusing on one of the following three outcomes:

    • 2.1 A global perspective on world events
    • 2.2 An acquaintance with languages, practices, and relationships between and among the arts, humanities, and sciences
    • 2.3 The necessary knowledge and the ability to live a healthier life

    Students would begin taking Element II courses in their sophomore year and complete their Element II courses by the end of their junior year. Students would take one Element II course for each goal. Students could take two Element II courses in the same semester if necessary in order to meet course requirements for their major(s). Transfer students with associates degrees would not have to take Element II courses.

    Summary of Element II

    • Element II courses are team-taught by two or three faculty from different disciplines.
    • Students take three four-credit inter/multi-disciplinary courses, one each relating to global perspectives; ways of knowing; and healthy living during the sophomore and junior years.

    Element III

    Courses in Element III engage students in a meaningful service-learning activity that is core to the Vincentian mission of the College. Service-learning is a course-based educational process combining engagement in the community and guided reflection designed to raise awareness of social problems and their root causes. Courses in Element III emphasize faith, spirituality, and ethics.

    Element III requires students to engage in some kind of service activity involving a curriculum (course content) and participation in service that is mission-driven.

    A key focus is the opportunity for students to apply what they are learning in real-world settings and reflect on their service experience.

    Service may be offered as a collaborative partnership with the College and the community-at-large, or offered as service within the college.

    There are three Student Learning Outcomes to be met in Element III:

    • 3.1 An understanding of faith and spirituality and an appreciation of their significance within the human community
    • 3.2 The ability and desire to act ethically
    • 3.3 An appreciation for the value of service and responsibility to the human community and the environment

    The Element III model links who our students are (Women's College, Continuing Studies and transfer students) and how our students can meet all the requirements for Element III.

    • Element III would be a total of 4 credits. This includes an Element III course and service. Service will not be awarded credit.
    • A minimum of 20 hours of service is required.
    • Two program options will be offered to meet different student needs: Option A and Option B (as described below).
    • The course component of Element III, whether in Option A or B, will be interdisciplinary and collaboratively taught.
    • The interdisciplinary course will include instruction from a Theology faculty member in order to meet the learning criteria established under Outcome 1: (Understanding faith and spirituality).
    • Element III will include three components: 1) Service―collaborative partnership with the college and community or service within the college. 2) Course content―applying academic knowledge through course readings, classroom discussions, lectures and to learning in a community setting where students derive meaning and relevance from their course content, and 3) Reflection― where students develop a deeper understanding of course content, as well as how course content and service are related to the community, and social issues, congruent with the Mission and Values of the College through written reflections.
    • All service-learning activities will receive a designed coding by the Registrar Office as "Element III Service-Learning."
    • Element III is linked to ePortfolio development.

    Option A is designed for the student that prefers or needs a structured learning course, or who may prefer to complete all three goals in Element III in one semester. Under Option A, the service component will be embedded in an Element III course.

    Option B is designed for the student desiring a more flexible service-learning format. Under Option B, students complete the Element III course content as a separate entity ―offered as either an on-campus course or as an online course, and have the opportunity to develop an individualized service experience.

    While it may be possible that an Option B Element III course may offer a pre-established service-learning activity, the student will have theopportunity to select this option or develop an individualized service experience.

    Students choosing Option B will also have the preference of completing the service-learning concurrent with the course, or at later time. However, the service requirement must be fulfilled prior to beginning Element IV.

    Under Option B, should a course in a major offer a service-learning component, this may only be applied to the Element III service requirement under the following conditions:

    1. An Element III content course is taken as a pre-requisite.
    2. The service offered in the major meets the criteria of Goal 3.3, and student learning outcomes can be adequately measured and assessed.
    3. Faculty interested in offering service as part of a course in the major must first seek approval by a committee (to be designated at later date) that will oversee service proposals for Element III.

    Summary of Element III

    • One four-credit course
    • Service is not awarded credit
    • Requires a minimum of 20 hours of service
    • Option A: structured service-learning where service is embedded in course content.
    • Option B: learning is more flexible where an Element III course is taken as a prerequisite or co-requisite followed by the completion of service aligned with the course, or as part of another course within the student's major, or an open elective.

    Element IV

    Element IV is a Capstone Seminar course designed to provide students with the opportunity to consider their General Educational experience in its entirety:

    • A key focus is the integration, exploration, and application of General Education Learning Experiences.
    • There is one 4-credit seminar course in Element IV that will be completed in either junior or senior year. Class sizes would generally be limited to 15 students.

    As seen, there is one Student Learning Outcome to be met in Element IV, with four distinguishing criteria: an integration of knowledge and approaches from the various disciplines, from making simple connections among ideas and experiences to synthesizing and transferring learning to new, complex situations within and beyond the campus.

    Students are able to:

    • 4.1a. Reflect on General Education learning experiences in relation to life-long learning.
    • 4.1b. Examine the ethical implications of contemporary issue(s) by applying knowledge from various disciplines.
    • 4.1c. Explore the deepest questions about life.
    • 4.1d. Develop common ground among different points of view.

    Summary of Element IV

    The Element IV Capstone Seminar would be taught by one professor who will serve as instructor and mentor as students realize and compile their capstone project.

    The capstone project will consist of a capstone ePortfolio in which the students integrate their whole CSE Essentials General Education experience, reflecting further on what they did, how they did it, what they learned, and most importantly, the connections between what they learned.

    The CSE Essentials General Education ePortfolio will be finalized through the construction of the capstone ePortfolio, demonstrating the students' synthesis of knowledge and experience.

  • CSE Essentials Course Description

    CSE100: Foundations in Literacy
    Designed for students who specifically need enrichment in literacy skills sets, the course will comprise of a student cohort, and involve an integrated learning community of developmentally structured contextual expository writing\literacy instruction, coupled with content-area instruction on the theme of how to live a healthy life, broadly construed. Two instructors will collaborate, the first, a literacy specialist, and the second, a content-area specialist, one of whom will also be a First Year Advisor to the cohort. The content will be infused with training on foundational Mission and Values, diversity, relationships, and leadership, as well as foundational information literacy, presentation skills, and technology and software. In addition, the course will be aligned with one or two community events related to Mission and Values and/or Student Life. The start of the CSE Essentials ePortfolio will be incorporated for the students involved. Note: Basic Writing Placement students only. 6 Credits.

    CSE110: Integrated Literacy I
    Designed for all students, the course will comprise of a student cohort, and involve an integrated learning community of developmentally structured argument and persuasive writing\literacy instruction, coupled with content-area instruction on the continuing theme of how to live a healthy life, broadly construed. Two instructors will collaborate, the first, a literacy specialist, and the second, a content-area specialist, one of whom will also be a First Year Advisor to the cohort. The content will be infused with training on emerging Mission and Values, diversity, relationships, and leadership, as well as emerging information literacy, presentation skills, technology and software, and foundational informal logic/generalized critical thinking. In addition, the course will be aligned with one or two community events related to Mission and Values and/or Student Life. The start or continuation of the CSE Essentials ePortfolio will be incorporated for the students involved. Prerequisite: English Composition I Placement, or CSE100. 6 Credits.

    CSE120: Integrated Literacy II
    Designed for all students, the course will comprise of a student cohort, and involve an integrated learning community of developmentally structured contextual research writing and advanced information literacy instruction, coupled with content-area instruction on the concluding theme of how to live a healthy life, broadly construed. Two instructors will collaborate, the first, a literacy specialist, and the second, a content-area specialist, one of whom will also be a First Year Advisor to the cohort. The content will be infused with training on intermediate Mission and Values, diversity, relationships, and leadership, as well as intermediate presentation skills, technology and software, and emerging informal logic/generalized critical thinking. In addition, the course will be aligned with one or two community events related to Mission and Values and/or Student Life. The continuation of the CSE Essentials ePortfolio will be incorporated for the students involved. Prerequisite: CSE110. 6 Credits.

    CSE191: Writing Seminar
    Designed for all transfer and Continuing Studies students who are exempt from taking CSE110 and CSE120, the course will serve as an introduction to the college's general education curriculum and Mission and Values. It will involve developmentally structured research writing and advanced information literacy instruction, as well as some integrated or aligned training in presentation skills, technology and software, and informal logic/generalized critical thinking. A reflective component on the student's general education experiences will be incorporated; students will create a reflective pre-capstone portfolio (eportfolio) regarding the general education experience. Prerequisite: English Composition I and II at an accredited institution. 4 Credits.

    CSE210: Global Perspectives
    Designed for all students, this is an interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary team taught course where students will be invited to learn about the world and the human community from multiple points of view. Students will explore the implications that world geography has on history, culture, and language. They will examine how factors such as culture, religion, race, socioeconomic status, and philosophical beliefs influence how world events and global challenges are interpreted by people. In addition, students will become more aware of the kinds of information that affect the human being both locally and globally, and of the impact that technology and scientific events have on the human condition. Meets CSE Essentials Element II Outcome 2.1. Prerequisite: CSE 110. 4 credits.

    CSE220: Ways of Knowing
    Designed for all students, this is an interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary team taught course where students will be invited to learn about the languages, practices, and relationships between and among the arts, humanities, and sciences. Specifically, students will explore the human experience from the standpoint of the arts and humanities, learn about scientific reasoning is a method of investigation, examine social issues, and ultimately become familiar with how these different ways of knowing connect with each other and provide a complete perspective on the world and the human community. Where mathematics is also integrated into the course, students will develop basic college level computational skills, and the ability to organize and interpret qualitative and quantitative data. Meets CSE Essentials Element II Outcome 2.2, and satisfies the college-level mathematics requirement where the course code includes the "M" suffix. Prerequisite: CSE 110. 4 credits.

    CSE230: Healthy Living
    Designed for all students, this interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary team taught course is designed to provide students with some of the necessary knowledge and skills for living a healthier life. From the standpoint of two or three disciplines, students will learn about the characteristics of emotionally healthy persons and interpersonal relationships, as well as the natures and importance of self-reflection and empathy. Students will also gain knowledge and experience concerning the importance of teamwork, conflict resolution, personal integrity, and good character. Overall, they will develop an understanding of healthy decision-making, and how to live a healthier life. Meets CSE Essentials Element II Outcome 2.3. Prerequisite: CSE 110. 4 credits.

    CSE300: Faith, Spirituality, and Ethics I
    Designed for all students, this is a collaboratively taught interdisciplinary course on faith, spirituality, and ethics that includes the integration of an embedded service learning component. As such, it satisfies all CSE Essentials Element III requirements. Students will learn about the natures of faith and spirituality, and their significance within the human community, as well as develop the ability to be empowered moral agents. Students will also engage in service learning projects or activities involving a minimum of 20 hours of service in which they will apply and engage the principles learned in the content component of the course. This course must be taken concurrently with CSE300SL. Prerequisite: CSE110, and at least one of: CSE210, CSE220 or CSE230, or permission from the Director of General Education. 4 credits.

    CSE300SL: Integrated Service-Learning
    Taken concurrently with CSE300, this is the integrated service learning lab. It involves a minimum of 20 hours of service in which students apply and engage the principles of faith, spirituality, and ethics learned in CSE300. Co-requisite: CSE 300. This course cannot be taken independently of CSE 300.

    CSE310: Faith, Spirituality, and Ethics II
    Designed for all students, this is a collaboratively taught interdisciplinary course on faith, spirituality, and ethics with the integration of an optional service learning component. Students will learn about the natures of faith and spirituality, and their significance within the human community, as well as develop the ability to be empowered moral agents. Students will also engage in service learning projects or activities involving a minimum of 20 hours of service in which they will apply and engage the principles learned in the content component of the course. The course satisfies all CSE Essentials Element III Requirements when taken with CSE310SL. Otherwise, this course must be taken either concurrently with, or be followed by an "SL" designated course within the major, or as an open elective, in order to satisfy such requirements. Prerequisite: CSE110, and at least one of: CSE210, CSE220 or CSE230, or permission from the Director of General Education. 4 credits.

    CSE310SL: Aligned Service-Learning
    Taken concurrently with CSE310, this is the optional aligned service learning lab. It involves a minimum of 20 hours of service in which students apply and engage the principles of faith, spirituality, and ethics learned in CSE310. Co-requisite: CSE 310. This course cannot be taken independently of CSE310.

    CSE400: Essentials Capstone
    This seminar course will provide students with the opportunity to reflect upon and consider their whole CSE Essentials leaning experience. The key focus of the course will be the integration, exploration, and application of the CSE Essentials learning experience through the development by each student of a mentored capstone ePortfolio. Students will reflect upon all of their CSE Essentials courses and activities in relation to their other curricular and con-curricular work, as well as to lifelong learning. Students will also examine the ethical implications of contemporary issues by applying knowledge in various disciplines; they will explore some of the deepest questions about life, and they develop an understanding of the common ground among different points of view. Satisfies CSE Essentials Element IV Requirements. Pre-requisite: Completion of all requirements for CSE Essentials Elements I, II, and III. 4 credits.

  • Important Terminology

    Team Teaching
    Classes that are team-taught will include 2-3 faculty members who will plan the course together, develop assignments, and devise a grading rubric. It is expected that all faculty will be involved in the delivery of each class session. This means that they will all be in the class together and be responsible for presenting the class material. Grading will be completed by all faculty. All Element 2 courses will utilize team teaching.

    Collaborative Teaching
    Classes are taught by two or three faculty members who plan the course content together and assignments for one class or aligned classes. Faculty are not in the classroom together, but work to coordinate assignments and content. Faculty share in the grading of assignments, but each faculty may grade individual assignments.

    Service Learning
    A course based integrative educational process combining engagement in the community and guided reflection designed to raise awareness of social problems and their root causes. Students engage in personally meaningful experiences that generate emotional, social, spiritual and cognitive learning and development. Service-learning opportunities are expressions of our commitment to the mission and values of the College of Saint Elizabeth. Grounded in gospel values, the principles of Catholic social teaching and in the spirit of St. Vincent de Paul, these opportunities invite students to a greater awareness of co-responsibility to systematic change and service to the world. Thus these opportunities are designed to be relevant and beneficial to the student, and college as well as to local, state, regional, national and global community leaders.


General Education Curriculum Requirements for students entering CSE BEFORE Fall 2012

The General Education Curriculum is a core component of the bachelor’s degree that develops common capacities in all College of Saint Elizabeth graduates regardless of major.  In this sense, it is the foundation of the undergraduate education offered by the College.

Through the study of the liberal arts and sciences, the General Education Curriculum will deepen students’ understanding of themselves and the world, foster values clarification, expose students to various approaches to knowledge, and encourage students to integrate this knowledge.

The General Education Curriculum presents forms of expression, fields of knowledge, and methods of inquiry fundamental to intellectual growth and to a mature understanding of the world and the human condition.  It is distinguished from education in the major which, while extending the purpose of the General Education Curriculum, deals with discipline-specific content and modes of inquiry in a highly focused and in-depth manner.

By successfully completing the General Education Curriculum, students will:

•           Acquire a foundation of broad-based knowledge of the major questions and methodologies in the disciplines of the liberal arts and sciences

•           Recognize and respect the importance of faith in God as a basis for a meaningful life

•           Attain clarity in values

•           Attain maturity in moral reasoning

•           Appreciate the role of ethics in a just society

•           Understand and respect persons of diverse backgrounds

•           Develop aesthetic appreciation

•           Recognize the importance of maintaining physical fitness and a healthy lifestyle

•           Demonstrate competency in computation and quantitative reasoning

•           Develop research skills

•           Develop competency in oral communication skills

•           Develop competency in written communication skills

•           Develop competency in information literacy skills

•           Develop a proficiency in a second language

To achieve these aims, the General Education Curriculum has been constructed around five Cluster Areas:

1.         Literature/Fine Arts/Foreign Language

2.         Social and Behavioral Sciences

3.         Natural and Physical Sciences, Mathematics and Computer Science

4.         Philosophy, Theology and History

5.         Perspectives on an Interdependent World

Guidelines regarding the application of credits to the General Education Curriculum Requirements:

•           Single-major students typically may not double count courses for both their major and General Education Curriculum Requirements.

•           Exceptions to the above rule include:

Students majoring in Philosophy, Theology or History do not need to take an additional course beyond their major requirements to fulfill the Cluster 4 Requirement in their major subject area. 

English majors do not need to take an additional course beyond their major requirements to fulfill the Cluster 1 requirement in British, American or Foreign Literature.

•           When possible, related-requirement courses in a student’s major may be used to meet General Education Curriculum Requirements.

•           When possible, double majors may count courses from both majors toward fulfillment of General Education Curriculum Requirements.

General Education Form

Cluster 1: Literature, Fine Arts, and Language (9 credits)

By taking courses in this Cluster Area, students will be exposed to forms of expression that capture the human experience, provide metaphors for the human condition, and provide an opportunity for aesthetic experience. 

To meet the requirements for Cluster 1, students must complete:

•           three credits of American, British or Foreign Literature

•           three credits of Art History or Music History

•           three credits of Art, Music, English, Communication, or

Foreign Language

The specific courses approved for meeting Cluster 1 Requirements are:

The Literature component of Cluster 1 can be met by taking one of the following courses:

ENG 120 The Reading Life

ENG 239 Women’s Literature:A Different Voice

ENG 247 Critical Reading

ENG 253 European Literature and Related Arts II

FLAN 260 Special Topics:Greek and Roman Literature

ENG/FLAN 263 Greek and Roman Mythology

FLAN 239 Masterpieces of French Literature in Translation

FLAN 243 Hispanics in the U.S.: History and Culture

FLAN 249 Images of Women in Foreign Literature

FLAN 255 Masterpieces of World Literature

FLAN 257 Masterpieces of World Literature II

SPA 329 Literature of Spain to 1700

SPA 333 Literature of Spain 1700 to Present

SPA 339 Literature of Spanish America

The Art History or Music History component of Cluster 1 can be met by taking one of the following courses:

ART 115 Drawing and Painting

ART 119 Introduction to Photography

ART 201 Color and Design

ART 231 Art History I:Ancient and Medieval Art

ART 233 Art History II:Ranaissance and Baroque Art

ART 237 Art History III:Modern Art

ART 239 The Feminine Aesthetic

ART 241 Art of the WesternWorld Survey

ART 245 Insights into Culture Through Visual Art:Selected Topics

MUS 119 The Lives and Music of the Great Composers

MUS 121 Lives and Music of Female Composers

MUS 123 Great Performers of the Western World

MUS 125 Learning to Listen to Music

MUS 151 The Broadway Musical:America’s Major Contribution to Theater

MUS 155 Music and Ideas

MUS 223 Elizabeth Singers

MUS 227 Elizabeth Ringers Handbell Choir

MUS 229 Community Choir

MUS 231 Opera and Oratorio

MUS 233 American Music

MUS 255 The Joy of Bach

MUS 257 Beethoven and Friends

MUS 259 The Great Romantics

MUS 261 Music of Our Time

The third component of Cluster 1 can be met in one of the following ways:

• by taking one of the Literature,Art History, or Music History courses listed above

• by taking a Foreign Language course not being applied to the Foreign Language Competency Requirement

• by taking one of the following Communication courses:

COMM 201 Oral Interpretation of Literature

COMM 205 Communication Strategies for the Work Place

COMM 207 Dynamics of Communication

COMM 219 Mass Media

COMM 223 Fundamentals of Public Speaking

COMM 243 Cross-cultural Communication

COMM 275 Visual Communication

• by taking three of the following 1-credit Leadership courses:

LDSP 111 Becoming a Leader

LDSP 200 Career Planning and Exploration

or

LDSP 220 Transition:College to Career

LDSP 301 Leadership Theories

LDSP 401 Leadership Senior Seminar

• by taking one of the following English courses:

ENG 200 American English Grammar

ENG 209 Women in Film

ENG 228 American Film

ENG 229 International Film

Cluster 2: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credits)

By taking courses in this Cluster Area, students will learn the systematic and critical inquiry of these disciplines used to develop an understanding of human behavior, human relationships, and social institutions within the context of our multicultural, global society.

To meet the requirements for Cluster 2, students must complete:

•           three credits of Psychology or Sociology

•           three credits of Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or another approved course

The Psychology or Sociology component of Cluster 2 can be met by taking one of the following courses:

PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology

PSY 191 Developmental Psychology:The Human Life Span

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

SOC 201 Social Problems

SOC 211 Deviant Behavior

SOC 251 Sociology of the Family

SOC 281 Sociology of Aging

The second component of Cluster 2 can be met in one of the following ways:

• by taking an additional course in Psychology or Sociology, among those listed above

• by taking one of the Economics, Political Science, or other courses listed below:

ECO 105 Principles of Economics I

ECO 107 Principles of Economics II

 All 100- and 200-level Political Science courses meet this component of Cluster 3.

AMST 101 Introduction to American Studies

AMST 273 American Culture Studies

JUS 101 Introduction to Justice Studies

SOC 200 Cultural Anthropology

Cluster 3:Natural and Physical Sciences,Mathematics and Computer Science (6-8 credits)

By taking courses in this Cluster Area, students will learn the use of formal, rational methods applied in the understanding of nature and in problem solving.

To meet the requirements for Cluster 3, students must complete:

•           three-four credits of Biology, Chemistry or Physics

•           three-four credits of Mathematics or Computer Science

The specific courses approved for meeting Cluster 3 Requirements are:

The Natural and Physical Sciences component of Cluster 3 can be met by taking one of the following courses:

APPSC 205 Earth Science

BIO 101 Biology in Society

BIO 103 Concepts of Biology

BIO 105 Human Genetics

BIO 107 Environmental Conservation

BIO 109 Microbes and Society

BIO 117 Human Physiology

BIO 123 Physical Science/Laboratory

BIO/CHEM 125 Women and Science: History,Health and Hope

CHEM 103 Energy – Present and Future

CHEM 105 Science and Society

CHEM 107 Chemistry and the Environment

CHEM 109 Chemistry of Consumer Products

CHEM 111 Chemistry and Health

CHEM 113 Introduction to Forensic Science

CHEM 115 Introduction to General and Organic Chemistry/Laboratory

CHEM 121 Introductory Chemistry/Laboratory

CHEM 123 Introductory Organic Chemistry/Laboratory

CHEM 151 Fundamental Principles of Chemistry I/Laboratory

CHEM 153 Fundamental Principles of Chemistry II/Laboratory

PE 217 Science Fundamentals of Environmental Health

PHYS 103 Physics in Our ModernWorld

PHYS 149 General Physics I

PHYS 153 General Physics II

FN 201 Introductory Nutrition

The Mathematics or Computer Science component of Cluster 3 can be met by taking one of the following courses:

MATH 119 Elementary Statistics

MATH 125 Elementary Statistics with Business Applications

MATH 135 Contemporary Mathematics

MATH 139 College Algebra

MATH 141 Linear Algebra for Computer Science

MATH 149 Pre-Calculus Mathematics

MATH 151 Calculus I

MATH 153 Calculus II

MATH 155 Linear Algebra

MATH 253 Calculus III

CS 105 Introduction to Computers and Internet

CS 115 Fundamentals of Computers and Programming

Cluster 4: Philosophy,Theology and History (12 credits)

By taking courses in Philosophy and Theology, students will reflect on ultimate questions, increase their respect for human dignity, develop a method of principled reasoning, and deepen their understanding of and commitment to God.

By taking coursework in History, students will utilize multiple perspective-taking as a means of freeing them from the present and culture-bound ways of thinking and offer a glimpse at the development of human civilization.

To meet the requirements for Cluster 4, students must complete:

•           three credits of Philosophy

•           six credits of Theology

•           three credits of History

The Philosophy component of Cluster 4 can be met by taking one of the following courses:

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL 103 Logic and Rhetoric

PHIL 105 Philosophers Look at God

PHIL 111 Philosophy of Art

PHIL 201 Philosophy of Religion

PHIL 203 The Human Person

PHIL 205 Survey of the History of Philosophy

PHIL 207 Selected Existentialist Philosophers

PHIL 211 Philosophy in Literature

PHIL 213 American Philosophy

PHIL 215 Philosophy in Film

PHIL 217 History of Ancient Philosophy

PHIL 219 History of Medieval Philosophy

PHIL 221 History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy

PHIL 225 Philosophy of Being and God

PHIL 233 Ethics in Business and Society

Nursing majors only may fulfill their Philosophy requirement by taking:

PHIL 331 Ethics in Health Care

The Theology component of Cluster 4 can be met by taking two of the following courses:

THEO 110 Hebrew Scriptures

THEO 113 The New Testament

THEO 135 Ecology and Faith

THEO 175 Christian Spirituality Today

THEO 195 21st Century and the Spirit of Charity

THEO 199 Travel and Study Tours

THEO 200 Bioethics

THEO 210 History of Christianity

THEO 221 Fundamental Moral Theology

THEO 235 Children of Abraham, Sarah and Hagar

THEO 239 Christian Sexual Ethics

THEO 250 Introduction to Christian Ethics

THEO 260 Religion in America

The History component of Cluster 4 can be met by taking one approved course in that subject area:

All 100- and 200-level History courses meet the General Education Curriculum Requirement in that subject area.

Cluster 5: Perspectives on an Interdependent World (3 credits)

By taking coursework in this Cluster Area, students will understand the role that diverse cultures, values, and gender issues play in today’s interdependent world.

To meet the requirement for Cluster 5, students must complete:

•           three credits from the list of courses approved for that purpose.

The specific courses approved for meeting Cluster 5 Requirement appear in Appendix A: General Education Curriculum.

The Cluster 5 requirement can be met by taking one of the following courses:

ART 239 The Feminine Aesthetic:Women in Visual Art

ART 245 Insights into Culture Through Visual Arts:Selected Topics

BIO/CHEM 125 Women and Science: History,Health and Hope

CHEM 105 Science and Society

COMM 243 Cross-cultural Communication

COMM 275 Visual Communication

ENG 209 Women in Film

ENG 229 International Film

ENG 239 Women’s Literature:A Different Voice

ENG 253 European Literature and Related Arts II

ENG/FLAN 263 Greek and Roman Mythology

FLAN 205 Francophone Cultures

WL 211 Caribbean Cultures

FLAN 235 Cross Culture Studies:Multiculture in U.S.

FLAN 239 Masterpieces of French Literature in Translation

FLAN 243 Hispanics in the U.S.: History and Culture

FLAN 249 Images of Women in Foreign Literature

FLAN 255 Masterpieces of World Literature I in Translation

FLAN 257 Masterpieces of World Literature II in Translation

FN 217 World Foods

GS 253 World Culture Studies

HIS 245 Women’s History

HIS 255 Latin American History

HIS 261 The Middle East

HIS 265 Asian History

HIS 271 African History

HIS 275 The Holocaust

WS 105 Introduction to Women’s Studies

MUS 119 The Lives and Music of the Great Composers

MUS 121 Lives and Music of Female Musicians

MUS 259 The Great Romantics

MUS 261 Music of our Time

PHYS 103 Physics in Our Modern World

PS 231 International Relations

PS 251 Comparative Politics

PSY 231 Gender and the Human Experience

PSY 281 Multicultural Psychology

SOC 200 Cultural Anthropology

SOC 221 Cultural Diversity

THEO 235 Children of Abraham, Sarah and Hagar

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