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Contact Information

Michelle McCoy Barrett, Ph.D.
Phone: (973) 290-4027
Email: mbarrett01@cse.edu
Office: Henderson Hall, 222D

Thomas C. Barrett, Ph.D.
Psy.D. Coordinator
Phone: (973) 290-4106
Email: tbarrett@cse.edu
Office: Henderson Hall, 222E

Valerie Scott, Ed.D.
Master's Coordinator
Phone: (973) 290-4107
Email: vscott@cse.edu
Office: Henderson Hall, 222C

Psychology

Program Overview

The Psychology Program offers a 40-credit undergraduate major leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree, as well as an 18-credit minor. The Program is open to both women and men through evening coursework, and traditional age Women's College students. The Psychology Graduate Program, open to both women and men, offers a Master's in Counseling Psychology with three specialization options, a Master's in Forensic Psychology and Counseling and a Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology.

The mission of the Psychology Program is to facilitate students' understanding of the science of psychology, as well as the values, knowledge, and skills required to pursue empowerment of self and others in a social justice context.

Students will acquire a broad understanding of the discipline of psychology, as well as a global awareness of issues affecting the development of psychological knowledge in other countries. At the same time, they will develop an appreciation of principles of ethical decision making, the importance of resilience, self-efficacy and self-advocacy as cornerstones of self-respect and self-determination, and the fundamental duty of social justice in working with underserved groups.

The Programs will prepare students to implement a range of empowerment strategies in their personal and interpersonal lives and work productively in their chosen fields.

Outcomes

Student learning outcomes for the Psychology Program include:

  • Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, research methodology, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.
  • Recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of sociocultural diversity.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the global nature of the discipline and issues affecting psychology in other countries.
  • Apply psychological principles to promote social justice.
  • Develop self-understanding and sense of purpose in life and implement a range of strategies to enhance self-efficacy.
  • Successfully complete a career development plan that will guide students' professional goals.
  • Promote an understanding of current ethical, social, and legal issues facing the helping professional.
  • Promote the application of psychological theory to effectively guide individual growth, change and development.
  • Develop leadership skills to effectively guide change in the promotion and delivery of counseling services to the public.

Graduates

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

Students who complete the degree in psychology will have a broad range of skills applicable to many human services as well as business employment settings. The Program provides a rigorous education in fundamental content areas such as human development and personality theory, but also teaches students to think critically and communicate effectively. These are skills that are highly sought after by employers in corporations, hospitals, schools, counseling centers, and group homes. With a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology from the College of Saint Elizabeth, students are eligible for entry-level positions in the mental health field and have been hired in community agencies, hospital programs, and in group homes.

Students who complete the Program are also well prepared to pursue Master's and Doctoral degrees. Many of our graduates have earned these advanced degrees from institutions such as:

  • College of Saint Elizabeth
  • Columbia University
  • Fairleigh Dickinson University
  • Fordham University
  • John Jay School of Criminal Justice
  • New York University
  • Seton Hall University
  • Stevens Institute of Technology
  • University of Missouri

Many psychology majors choose to double major and/or minor in related disciplines such as education, sociology, justice studies, biology, nutrition and business. Students are encouraged to discuss these options with their advisor because completing a second major and/or minor along with the major in psychology broadens students' career choices. The Minor in Psychology is also a good option to combine with a major in another discipline such as sociology or business. The minor will also give students the option to apply to graduate programs in psychology.

Master's in Counseling Psychology

The Master's program in Counseling Psychology, building on a multidisciplinary core, has been designed to prepare working adults to meet the challenges involved in providing counseling services to individuals and/or groups, and to be effective facilitators of change and growth.

Students who complete the program are well prepared to pursue doctoral degrees or enter professional work settings. The 60-credit mental health specialization meets the educational requirements for licensure as a professional counselor in New Jersey. The 48-credit school counseling specialization meets the educational requirements for certification as a School Counselor in New Jersey. The 30-credit specialization prepares students to apply for doctoral training in Psychology.

Admissions Criteria for Master's Programs

The graduate psychology courses of study are coeducational. Applicants for Master's Programs must have a baccalaureate degree, with a minimum of nine credits in psychology including the following courses: General Psychology, Developmental Psychology (Child Development, Adolescent Development, Adult Development or a Life Span Development course), and Psychopathology (Abnormal Psychology). Applicants should note that undergraduate Statistics and Experimental Psychology are prerequisites for PSY631: Research Methods and Program Evaluation. The baccalaureate degree must be from an accredited undergraduate institution with a cumulative GPA of not less than 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Students will be invited for an interview based on their academic achievement, letters of reference, personal statement and relevant experiences. The interview will include a case review.

Transfer of credit into the graduate programs will be subject to evaluation and approval by the Course of Study Coordinator. All graduate transfer credits must carry a minimum grade of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. A maximum of six transfer credits will be accepted for the Masters in Counseling Psychology 30-credit track and a maximum of nine credits for the 48-credit school counseling and 60-credit mental health tracks, and the Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology and Counseling. Faculty members regularly evaluate the progress of each student enrolled in the Master's Programs. This review addresses both the student's progress toward the completion of the academic degree and the student's development as a counseling practitioner. Students must continue to develop in both areas. Depending on the outcome of this evaluation, students may be required to take remedial action such as repeating course work, taking additional practica, taking a leave of absence, etc. In unusual instances, the student may be terminated from the programs as a result of the evaluation process. Rarely the behavior of a given student will suggest psychological impairment which, in the professional judgment of the faculty, would interfere with the person's ability to function in a counseling career or in counseling settings. In such a case, the programs reserve the right to ask students to take remedial actions such as: seeking counseling, taking a leave of absence, repeating course work, enrolling in further course work, or if necessary, withdrawing from the programs.

Requirements

B.A. in Psychology

  • PSY100 Introduction to Psychology (4)
  • PSY110 Orientation to the Psychology Major (1)
  • PSY230 Research Methods and Statistics I (3)
  • PSY230L Research Methods and Statistics I Lab (0)
  • PSY233 Research Methods and Statistics II (3)
  • PSY233L Research Methods and Statistics II Lab (0)
  • PSY301 Seminar in History and Systems of Psychology (2)
  • PSY390 Junior Seminar in Psychology (1)
  • PSY490 Senior Research Seminar (2)

Total: 16 credits

Breadth Area Restricted Electives

Students must choose one course from Area I and two courses each from Areas II and III.

I. Understanding the Biological and Cognitive Basis of Behavior

  • PSY331 Biological Basis of Behavior (4)
  • PSY309 Cognitive Psychology (4)

Total: 4 credits

II. Understanding Individual Differences

  • PSY320 Personality Theory (4)
  • PSY315 Psychological Tests and Measurements (4)
  • PSY200 Lifespan Development I: Child and Adolescent Development (4)
  • PSY203 Lifespan Development II: Adult Development and Aging (4)

Total: 8 credits

III. Understanding the Social/Cultural Bases of Behavior

  • PSY400 Seminar in Multicultural/Gender Studies (4)
  • PSY403 Seminar in Social Psychology (4)
  • PSY405 Seminar in International and Cultural Issues in Psychology (4)
    (PSY400 and PSY405 are open only to Psychology Majors and Minors)
    (PSY403 is open only to Psychology and/or Sociology Majors and Minors)

Total: 8 credits

Free Electives:

Students must choose two courses from the following:

  • PSY209 Understanding Self and Others (2)
  • PSY217 Introduction to Counseling (2)
  • PSY219 Crisis Intervention (2)
  • PSY210 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (2)
  • PSY207 Industrial Organizational Psychology (2)
  • PSY340 Abnormal Psychology (4)
    (PSY320 and PSY331 are prerequisites for PSY340)
  • PSY250 Counseling and Spirituality (2)
  • PSY499 Special Topics in Psychology (2)

Total: 4 credits

Total Credits for Bachelor of Arts in Psychology: 40

Capstone Requirement

Students fulfill the College of Saint Elizabeth capstone requirement by successfully passing a three-part comprehensive examination. The comprehensive examination includes a standardized test of achievement in the field of psychology, a written essay and journal article critique, and a career portfolio. Preparation for the examination is offered in PSY490 Senior Research Seminar.

Minor in Psychology

  • PSY100 Introduction to Psychology (4)
  • PSY230 Research Methods and Statistics I (3)
  • PSY230L Research Methods and Statistics I Lab (0)
  • PSY233 Research Methods and Statistics II (3)
  • PSY233L Research Methods and Statistics II Lab (0)
  • PSY301 Seminar in History and Systems of Psychology (2)
  • Psychology Breadth Area Restricted Elective (4)
  • Psychology Free Elective (2)

Total: 18 credits

Combined Baccalaureate to Master's Degree

The Combined Baccalaureate to Master's Degree Program enables highly motivated undergraduate students to transition into the 30 credit M.A. in Counseling Psychology program while still completing the College's baccalaureate program.

Students may apply to enter this program at the end of their junior year. Juniors who apply must have a minimum 3.4 undergraduate GPA for admission. Students must submit one letter of recommendation from a faculty member and one from their internship (PSY495) or volunteer work demonstrating experience in the field. In addition to their application and letters, students should submit a personal statement clearly articulating their career goals and how the 30 credit M.A. program will help them meet these goals. Successful applicants will be interviewed by two faculty members and an admission decision will be made. Graduate courses begin in the fall semester of the senior year and 12 credits will double count toward the Bachelor's and Master's degree requirements. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 when they receive the Bachelor's degree in order to continue in graduate courses and complete the Master's degree. Combined degree students are expected to continue in the master's program without interruption until completion or risk being dismissed. Combined degree students who need to interrupt their studies must apply and be granted a leave of absence in order to interrupt their studies.

Year One
Fall

  • PSY100 Introduction to Psychology (4)

Spring

  • PSY110 Orientation to the Psychology Major (1)
  • PSY217 Introduction to Counseling (2)
  • PSY203 Lifespan Development II (4)

Year Two
Fall

  • PSY301 Seminar in History and Systems of Psychology (2)
  • PSY230 Research Methods and Statistics I (3)
  • PSY230L Research Methods and Statistics I Lab (0)

Spring

  • PSY233 Research Methods and Statistics II (3)
  • PSY233L Research Methods and Statistics II Lab (0)
  • PSY320 Personality Theory (4)
  • PSY331 Biological Basis of Behavior (4)

Year Three
Fall

  • PSY390 Junior Seminar (1)
  • PSY400 Seminar in Multicultural/Gender Studies (4)
  • PSY495 (2) recommended Internship

Spring

  • PSY340 Abnormal Psychology (4)
  • PSY405 International and Cultural Issues in Psychology Seminar (4)

Year Four
Fall

  • PSY490 Senior Seminar (2)
  • PSY601 Orientation to the Profession (3)
  • PSY620 The Helping Relationship (3) 12 total credits
  • *Students must pass the Capstone Requirement in the fall of year 4.

Spring

  • PSY633 Counseling Theories and Methods I (3)
  • PSY635 Assessment and Evaluation in Counseling (3)

Summer

  • MC626 Ethical Issues in Human Services Leadership (3)

Year Five
Fall

  • PSY631 Research Methods and Advanced Statistics (3)
  • PSY641 Psychopathology and Diagnosis (3)
  • PSY639 Human Growth and Personality Development or elective (3)

Spring

  • PSY637 Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Relationships (3)
  • PSY643 Career Development and Occupational Opportunities (3), or

    PSY671 Counseling Theories and Methods III for those students who want supervised experience.
  • PSY697 Culminating Project (0)

M.A. in Counseling Psychology

Specialization in Counseling Psychology

The 30-credit hour specialization in Counseling Psychology is the main track in the degree. It consists of 24 credit hours in a core curriculum, three credit hours from an elective course and three credit hours from the CSE Multidisciplinary Core. Additionally, any student who would like to take PSY671: Counseling Theories and Methods III: Practicum for additional training would be allowed to do so, but only as over and above the 30 required credit hours. A culminating project is required in lieu of a thesis.

Core Courses: 24 credits

  • PSY601 Orientation to the Profession (3)
  • PSY620 The Helping Relationship in Counseling (3)
  • PSY631 Research Methods and Program Evaluation (3)
  • PSY633 Counseling Theories and Methods I (3)
  • PSY635 Assessment and Evaluation in Counseling (3)
  • PSY637 Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Relationships (3)
  • PSY641 Psychopathology and Diagnosis (3)
  • PSY643 Career Development and Occupational Opportunities (3)
  • PSY697 Culminating Project (0)

Electives: 3 credits

  • PSY606 Infant, Child and Adolescent Development (3)
  • PSY639 Human Growth and Personality Development (3)
  • PSY653 Multicultural Counseling (3)
  • PSY659 Counseling Children and Adolescents (3)

Multidisciplinary Core: 3 credits

  • MC 626 Ethical Issues in Human Services Leadership (3)

Specialization in School Counseling

The specialty in School Counseling builds on the basic 30-credit hour curriculum by adding 18 additional credit hours. It is a 48-credit New Jersey Department of Education approved program consisting of 35 credit hours in counseling, four credit hours in the foundations and contextual dimensions of school counseling, three credit hours in supervised practicum and six credit hours in supervised field experience in a school setting. A culminating project is required in lieu of a thesis.

Core Courses in Counseling: 35 credits

  • PSY601 Orientation to the Profession (2)
  • PSY619 Psychological Issues for Special Needs Populations (3)

OR

  • PSY620 The Helping Relationship in Counseling (3)
  • PSY631 Research Methods and Program Evaluation (3)
  • PSY633 Counseling Theories and Methods I (3)
  • PSY634 Counseling Theories and Methods II (3)
  • PSY635 Assessment and Evaluation in Counseling (3)
  • PSY637 Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Communication (3)
  • PSY639 Human Growth and Personality Development (3)

OR

  • PSY606 Early Childhood, Child and Adolescent Development and Behaviors (3)
  • PSY643 Career Development and Occupational Opportunities (3)
  • PSY653 Multicultural Counseling (3)
  • PSY659 Counseling Children and Adolescents (3)
  • PSY675 Community Agencies and Resources (3)
  • PSY697 Culminating Project (0)

Foundations and Contextual Dimensions of School Counseling: 4 credits

  • PSY602 Foundations of School Counseling (2)
  • PSY604 Organization, Administration and Consultation in School Counseling Services (2)

Practicum and Field Experience in a School Setting: 9 credits

  • PSY671 Counseling Theories and Methods III: Practicum (3)
  • PSY691 Counseling Theories and Methods IV: Field Experience (3)
  • PSY693 Counseling Theories and Methods V: Field Experience (3)

Specialization in Mental Health Counseling

The specialty in Mental Health Counseling builds on the basic 30-credit hour curriculum by adding 30 credit hours to meet the New Jersey educational requirements for licensure as a professional counselor. This 60-credit hour program consists of three credit hours in the multidisciplinary core, 39 credit hours in counseling courses, nine credit hours in electives in counseling and nine credit hours of supervised practicum and field experience. A culminating project is required in lieu of a thesis.

Core Courses in Counseling: 39 credits

  • PSY601 Orientation to the Profession (3)
  • PSY615 Ethical and Legal Standards in Counseling (3)
  • PSY620 The Helping Relationship in Counseling (3)
  • PSY631 Research Methods and Program Evaluation (3)
  • PSY633 Counseling Theories and Methods I (3)
  • PSY634 Counseling Theories and Methods II (3)
  • PSY635 Assessment and Evaluation in Counseling (3)
  • PSY637 Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Communication (3)
  • PSY639 Human Growth and Personality Development (3)
  • PSY641 Psychopathology and Diagnosis (3)
  • PSY642 Treatment Planning (3)
  • PSY643 Career Development and Occupational Opportunities (3)
  • PSY653 Multicultural Counseling (3)
  • PSY697 Culminating Project (0)

Practicum and Field Experience: 9 credits

  • PSY671: Counseling Theories and Methods III: Practicum (3)
  • PSY691: Counseling Theories and Methods IV: Field Experience (3)
  • PSY693: Counseling Theories and Methods V: Field Experience (3)

Elective Courses: 9 credits

M.A. in Forensic Psychology and Counseling

The M.A. in Forensic Psychology and Counseling program is a 48-credit hour, cohort-based program offered over a 2-1⁄2 year time frame. A culminating project is required in lieu of a thesis.

Core Curriculum Courses shared with the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology: 24 credits

  • PSY620 The Helping Relationship in Counseling (3)
  • PSY631 Research Methods and Program Evaluation (3)
  • PSY633 Counseling Theories and Methods I (3)
  • PSY637 Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Communication (3)
  • PSY641 Psychopathology and Diagnosis (3)
  • PSY651 Substance Abuse Counseling (3)
  • PSY671 Counseling Theories and Methods III: Practicum (3)
  • PSY691 Counseling Theories and Methods IV: Field Experience (3)
  • PSY697 Culminating Project (0)

Core Curriculum Courses in Forensics Psychology: 21 credits

  • PSY621 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3)
  • PSY622 Violence and Risk Assessment (2)
  • PSY623 Trauma and Crisis Intervention (2)
  • PSY624 Psychological Assessment for Forensic Psychology I (3)
  • PSY625 Psychological Assessment for Forensic Psychology II (3)
  • PSY626 Evaluation and Treatment of Juvenile Offenders (3)
  • PSY627 Evaluation and Treatment of Adult Offenders (3)
  • PSY628 The Social Psychology of Crime and Criminal Behavior (2)

Core Curriculum Courses in Justice Studies: 3 credits

  • JUS 620: Law and Legal Systems (3)

Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Counseling Psychology

Admissions Criteria

The Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology is a four-year, full-time, cohort-based program with courses being offered in the fall, spring and summer. The curriculum consists of 88 credits of which 15 credits are completed by students through required courses in their Master's Programs and transferred into the Psy.D. program. The required courses are: Human Growth and Personality Development, Psychological Assessment, Psychopathology, Research Methods and Advanced Statistics, Counseling Theories, and Group Counseling. Although a three-credit course in Group Counseling is a prerequisite to the program, it is not accepted as a transfer course. In addition to these 15 credits in Master's-level courses, the curriculum includes 73 credits in doctoral-level coursework and supervision.

Faculty members regularly evaluate the progress of each student enrolled in the doctoral program. This review addresses both the student's progress toward the completion of the academic degree and the student's development as a practitioner. Students must continue to develop in both areas. Depending on the outcome of this evaluation, students may be required to take remedial action such as repeating course work, taking a leave of absence, etc. In unusual instances, the student may be terminated from the program as a result of the evaluation process. Rarely the behavior of a given student will suggest psychological impairment which, in the professional judgment of the faculty, would interfere with the person's ability to function as a mental health professional. In such a case, the program reserves the right to ask students to take remedial actions such as: seeking counseling, taking a leave of absence, or if necessary, withdrawing from the program.

Applicants to the Psy.D. program in counseling psychology are required to:

  • Have completed a Master's Degree in Counseling Psychology, Forensic Psychology and Counseling, or its equivalent,
  • Have completed three credits in each of the following Master's-level courses: Human Growth and Personality Development, Psychological Assessment, Psychopathology, Research Methods and Advanced Statistics, Counseling Theories, and Group Counseling,
  • Have a satisfactory degree of professional or applied experience,
  • Submit official scores on the Graduate Record Examination (Psychology GRE Subject Test is optional),
  • Submit a statement of professional goals: 3-6 pages, double-spaced, detailing the applicant's professional goals and including an autobiographical statement regarding the applicant's motivation for pursuing those goals,
  • Submit three letters of recommendation from professionals who can comment on the applicant's qualifications for doctoral study: at least one letter must be from a professor attesting to academic capability and at least one must be from a practitioner attesting to professional capacity,
  • Submit official transcripts of all graduate and undergraduate work,
  • Submit a curriculum vitae,
  • Submit a completed application form.

Selected applicants are invited to interview with representatives of the Psy.D. faculty.

First Academic Year: 21 credits

Fall 9 credits:

  • PSY702 Recent and Advanced Theories of Personality (3)
  • PSY710 Advanced Personality Assessment (3)
  • PSY719 Foundations of Counseling Psychology (3)

Spring 6 credits:

  • PSY716 Advanced Adult Psychopathology (3)
  • PSY712 Cognitive and Neuropsychological Assessment (3)

Summer 6 credits:

  • PSY700 Clinical Applications of Human Development (3)
  • PSY714 Advanced Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3)

Second Academic Year: 21 credits

Fall 6 credits:

  • PSY726 The Application of Social Justice in Psychological Treatment (3)
  • PSY732 Doctoral Practicum I (3)

Spring 9 credits:

  • PSY728 Advanced Research Methods and Statistical Design (3)
  • PSY733 Doctoral Practicum II (3)
  • PSY720 Techniques in Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)

Summer 6 credits:

  • PSY708 History and Systems of Psychology (3)
  • PSY734 Doctoral Practicum III (3)

Third Academic Year: 19 credits

Fall 6 credits:

  • PSY704 Human Learning (3)
  • PSY735 Doctoral Practicum IV (3)

Spring 7 credits:

  • PSY730 Counseling Research and Program Evaluation Research (3)
  • PSY740 Doctoral Project I (1)
  • PSY706 Physiological Psychology (3)

Summer 6 credits:

  • PSY742 Doctoral Project II (1)
  • PSY722 Theories and Techniques of Career Counseling (3)
  • PSY731 Program Management, Consultation, and Supervision for Counseling Psychology (2)

Fourth Academic Year: 12 credits

Fall 6 credits:

  • PSY744 Doctoral Project III (3)
  • PSY736 Doctoral Internship I (3)

Spring 6 credits:

  • PSY746 Doctoral Project IV (3)
  • PSY738 Doctoral Internship II (3)

Course Listing

Course Level: 1

PSY-100
Intro to Psychology*
Credit Hours: 4

This comprehensive introductory course will cover major concepts and topic areas of psychology including human and social science as well as biological or natural science approaches. Content areas will include research methodology, theoretical perspectives related to human development, personality, intelligence, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, biological psychology, learning and memory, and social behaviors. These content areas will be explored in the context of sociocultural diversity and the global nature of the discipline of psychology. Empirical findings related to diverse content areas will be explored.

PSY-110
Orientation to the Psychology Major
Credit Hours: 1

This course is required for all psychology students. Students will learn about the curriculum related to the major, APA style, and format guidelines for writing, and accessing resources for research. The focus of this course will be the development of a career development plan that will guide the student's professional goals. Development of the student's curriculum plan, self-assessment of skill sets and interests, career interest, and resume development will be projects that assist toward this goal. The diverse nature of the field of psychology will be discussed and its vast possibilities for future graduate school and career possibilities. Prerequisite: Psy 100

Course Level: 2

PSY-200
Lifespan DeveIopment I Child&Adolescent
Credit Hours: 4

This course will study prenatal development through adolescence. The biological, psychological, and social factors within the context of diverse cultural contexts will be explored. Areas including cognition, personality, language, and social development will be studied in relation to developments internationally as well as how these are related to other disciplines of study. Contemporary issues such as child care, child abuse, sexuality and intimacy, identity development and achievement, relationship formation with family and society and adjustment problems will be explored with an emphasis on social issues and how these impact policy and the application of knowledge and research related to development. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-203
Lifespan Development II Adult & Aging
Credit Hours: 4

This course will study the progression of early adulthood through middle and late adulthood, including geriatric and late in life issues from a developmental perspective. Factors both challenging as well as influencing successful aging will be explored. Biological, social, and psychological factors within the context of diverse cultural contexts will be explored. Research and knowledge acquired from other disciplines will be incorporated to more fully understand the broad sociocultural factors influencing development of all phases of adulthood. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-207
Industrial Organizational Psychology
Credit Hours: 2

This course is an introduction to the application of behavioral theory and research to work situations; to promoting self-awareness and self-empowerment; and in career planning and professional development. The various sub-specialties of I/O psychology will be examined, including personnel selection, performance appraisal, training and development, and organizational behavior. Emphasis is placed on the research methods employed by I/O psychologists and their application to current organizational issues. Additionally students will examine how I/O Psychology principles can be used to promote social justice.

PSY-209
Understanding Self & Others
Credit Hours: 2

In this course, students will acquire knowledge of psychological concepts critical to understanding themselves and communicating more effectively with others. Students will consider such topics as motivation, goal setting, self-awareness, personal problem solving, assertiveness, conflict management, forgiveness, and group dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the development of personal maturity and the establishment of culturally sensitive and just relationships as cornerstones for effective functioning in school, work, family, and community settings.

PSY-210
Intro to Forensic Psychology
Credit Hours: 2

This course will focus on the application of psychological knowledge and concepts to legal issues. Among the areas discussed are: (a) clinical-forensic applications of psychology to legal issues which may include: legal competencies; insanity, the prediction of dangerousness, civil commitment, compensation for emotional damages, confidentiality and the duty to protect, and ethical conflicts and issues in working in the legal system; and (b) legal-forensic (non-clinical) application of psychology to legal issues which may include: the history of forensic psychology; eyewitness memory, criminal investigation, and the trial and jury process. Particular emphasis will be placed on social justice and cultural sensitivity in working within forensic environments.

PSY-217
Introduction to Counseling
Credit Hours: 2

This course is an overview of the historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of counseling. This course will expose the student to the diverse nature of the helping profession and its role in a complex global and sociocultural context and the potential applications to broader public policy. The various roles and functions of the counselor are examined as well as potential career paths related to the counselor role. The development of the counselor's self awareness and self understanding and how this is related to efficacy in the counselor role will be explored as well.

PSY-219
Crisis Intervention
Credit Hours: 2

This course introduces students to the field of crisis intervention. Various approaches to defining and conceptualizing crisis intervention and its strategies will be explored. Theory, research, and practice will be studied in a diverse sociocultural context with an exploration of how these factors influence the self-understanding of the counselor and their response, and client's perspective in crisis. Contemporary issues including post-traumatic stress disorder, suicide, addiction, loss, and violence will be explored.

PSY-230
Research Methods & Statistics I
Credit Hours: 3

This course will introduce some of the core research methods and statistical techniques used in psychology. Non-experimental methods including observation, correlation, surveys, and ex-post- facto studies will be discussed. The scientific method and research process including controlling variables, descriptive statistics, as well as ethical issues related to research will be studied. Students will identify a research topic and complete a literature review. This will continue to develop into a proposal for research that will be continued in Research Methods ll. Prerequisite: PSY 100

PSY-230L
Research Methods & Statistics I Lab
Credit Hours: 0

This lab experience is a part of Psy 290 and must be taken at the same time. Students will participate in research exercises applying concepts acquired in Psy 290.

PSY-233
Research Methods & Statistics II
Credit Hours: 3

This course will examine experimental research design and inferential statistical analysis used in psychology. Topics will include hypothesis testing, understanding and selecting appropriate statistical designs, validity and reliability, confound control, data collection, analysis, and interpretation. The student will develop an original research proposal. A laboratory component will be included where the student will become familiar with statistical software to analyze and interpret data. Students must register for the laboratory component (233L) of this course, which students will take concurrently with Psy233. Prerequisites: Psy 230 and Psy 230L

PSY-233L
Research Methods & Statistics II Lab
Credit Hours: 0

This lab experience is a part of Psy 233 Research Methods and Statistics ll and must be taken at the same time. Students will participate in practice experiments and gain experience analyzing and interpreting data utilizing statistical software.

PSY-241
Intro to Psych & Educ of Except Learner
Credit Hours: 4

This course will study factors associated with the exceptional child within the educational setting. The student's knowledge base of the core biological, social, emotional, and cultural factors influencing the special needs and capacities of the exceptional learner will be explored. Contemporary research trends and the interdisciplinary nature of the developments in the field will be incorporated to promote the understanding of features including, family and social context, motivational tendencies, developmental features, and factors impacting achieving optimal psychological, social, and emotional functioning will be explored.

PSY-250
Counseling & Spirituality
Credit Hours: 2

In this course, students will acquire knowledge about the integration of spiritual and emotional development in life. They will consider the role of spirituality in physical and mental health, and how both spiritual and emotional issues can be ethically addressed in counseling. Such topics as resilience, self-efficacy, and self-transcendence will be considered. The course will specifically examine the cultural and social justice implications of spiritually integrated counseling.

PSY-251
Educational Psychology
Credit Hours: 4

This course will apply the principles of psychology to children and adolescents in an educational setting. Contemporary research and theory in regard to learning and instruction will be explored. Student diversity based on biological, cultural, motivational, and other sources of student variance and how to address and objectively assess these factors will be discussed. Classroom management, evaluative techniques, cognitive learning theory, conceptualizing student needs in the context of development and family and social variables will also be addressed.

Course Level: 3

PSY-301
Seminar in History&Systems of Psychology
Credit Hours: 2

This course surveys the historical roots of the content and research methodologies of psychology. The emergence from its philosophical and physiological roots will be explored, as well as the movement into historical schools of psychology, including Structuralism, Functionalism, Gestalt, Behaviorism, Psychoanalysis, and Humanism. Contemporary research and practice of the influences of these schools will be explored. Students will study psychology as a science that has emerged within the context of an international and multicultural perspective and how these are related to past schools of psychology and contemporary research and practice. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-309
Cognitive Psychology
Credit Hours: 4

This course is a study of the major concepts, research methodology, theoretical perspectives, socio-cultural influences, and empirical findings in human cognition. Topics will include attention, learning, memory, language, and problem solving. Students will also learn about current research in judgment, decision-making, and creativity. Students will also consider the practical applications of these areas of psychology to their own personal and professional development. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-315
Psychological Tests & Measurement
Credit Hours: 4

This course is an introduction to psychological testing emphasizing the problems of objectivity, reliability, and validity. It includes a survey of the basic instruments for assessing intelligence, abilities, interests, personality, and psychopathology. Consideration is given to the statistical theory upon which tests are based. The course is taught with consideration of social justice, socio-cultural and international issues in psychological testing. Students will also consider the practical applications of this area of psychology to their own personal and professional development. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-320
Personality Theory
Credit Hours: 4

This course is a systematic examination in historical perspective of the major theories of personality, their empirical status, and their application in the field of psychopathology. Emphasis is on humanistic theories, psychoanalytic theories, trait theories and learning theories, including the work of Rogers, Allport, Maslow, Freud, Erikson, Jung, Cattell, Miller, Bandura, and Skinner. Theoretical and methodological issues facing personality theorists will also be discussed. The course is taught with consideration of sociocultural issues important to the field and students will also consider the practical applications of this area of psychology to their own personal and professional development. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-331
Biological Basis of Behavior
Credit Hours: 4

This course serves as an introduction to neural mechanisms that integrate, coordinate, and control behavior. Topics will include sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, learning, thought, and language, with an introduction to the neuropharmacology of anxiety, aggression, depression, schizophrenia, and memory. Neuropsychological assessment, forensic issues, current research and the practical applications of this area of psychology to students' personal and professional development will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-340
Abnormal Psychology
Credit Hours: 4

A study of the major disturbances of thought, personality, and behavior including their symptoms, etiology, and treatment. Topics include neuroses, schizophrenia, affective disorders, organic brain syndromes, childhood disorders, psychosomatic disorders, alcoholism and drug abuse, and suicide. The course is taught with consideration of social justice and sociocultural issues important to the field and students will also consider the practical applications of this area of psychology to their own personal and professional development. Prerequisites: Psy 320 and Psy 331

PSY-390
Junior Seminar in Psychology
Credit Hours: 1

In this course students integrate their knowledge of psychology into their own career planning and development. Students will complete a variety of projects and assignments that investigate employment opportunities and options for graduate study in psychology that are compatible with their particular interests, strengths, backgrounds and culture. Students will also complete their Career Portfolio begun in the first year. Prerequisites: Psy 100 and Psy 110

Course Level: 4

PSY-400
Seminar in MultiCultural/Gender Studies
Credit Hours: 4

This course will examine the influence of culture on psychological development and psychological functioning. The emphasis will be on theory and empirical research and how these inform our understanding of the interface of culture and psychology. Among the topics discussed will be: the concept of culture, the concept of ethnic identity, the influence of culture on our perception and definition of abnormal behavior and the treatment of psychological disorders, and the experience of individuals who have endured oppression and exploitation based on their gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, religion or physical disabilities. Students will also consider the practical applications of this area of psychology to their own personal and professional development. This course is open only to Psychology Majors and Minors. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-403
Seminar in Social Psychology
Credit Hours: 4

The focus of this course is on Human behavior and experience in a social context. Topics include social thinking, social influences, social relations, and collective behavior. Recent applications of social psychology will also be addressed with special attention to social justice and socio-cultural issues. Students will also consider the practical applications of this area of psychology to their own personal and professional development. This course is open only to Psychology and Sociology Majors and Minors. Prerequisite: Psy 100

PSY-405
Sem International Cultural Issues in Psy
Credit Hours: 4

The course focuses on the history, status, and future directions of scientific and professional psychology throughout the world. It requires reading about, discussing, and writing about the relatively new specialty area of international psychology. This course will introduce psychology students and others to psychology around the world. In addition, the course focuses on understanding how principles of psychology can be utilized to confront and resolve global problems and conflicts. This course is open only to Psychology Majors and Minors. Prerequisite: PSY100

PSY-490
Senior Research Seminar
Credit Hours: 2

In this course an original research study is designed and conducted by student teams. Each team will be required to formulate a meaningful hypothesis, gather and interpret data, and draw conclusions based upon the data analysis. At the end of the semester, a complete research report is submitted. Methodological issues and statistical analysis will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSY290, PSY290L, PSY295, PSY295L and Senior status.

PSY-491
Ind Study
Credit Hours: 2

This course provides the opportunity for students to investigate an area of psychology which holds special interest for the student. Work is accomplished individually with the aid of a faculty member. Prerequisites: PSY100 and junior or senior status; approval of the course of study by the chairperson is required before registration.

PSY-495
Internship
Credit Hours: 2

The student completes an internship at a placement site arranged by a faculty member. The student will complete an internship at sites that provide experiences that promote the application of psychological principles to the real world. Sites chosen should be those that provide experiences that promote the recognition, understanding, and respect for the complexity of socio-cultural diversity, and facilitate personal and professional growth for the student. Prerequisite: Psychology major with junior or senior status, approval of the programs internship coordinator is required before registration.

PSY-499
Special Topics
Credit Hours: 2

An exploration of an area or special topic of current interest in psychology. The topic for any given semester will be determined by the department.

Course Level: 6

PSY-601
Orientation to the Profession
Credit Hours: 3

Issues involving the expectation, role, and identity of the mental health professional. Topics include relationship to other professionals, ethics, legal constraints and obligations, consultation, case conceptualization, and other current issues.

PSY-602
Foundations of School Counseling
Credit Hours: 2

This course provides an overview of the profession of school counseling, including professional roles and functions, history and trends, and the principles of school counseling.

PSY-604
Organiz, Admin, & Consult in School Cnsl
Credit Hours: 2

This course focuses on the organization and management of comprehensive school guidance and counseling programs and introduces the student to topics relevant to successful school counseling programs such as curriculum development; program development; and consultation, coordination, and collaboration in student services in elementary, middle, and secondary schools.

PSY-606
Early Child,Child & Adolescent Dev & Beh
Credit Hours: 3

This course will provide an overview of child and adolescent development with a focus on the educational and social implications of developmental diversity. Instructional modes will include lecture, discussion, media, research, and case studybased projects.

PSY-615
Ethical & Legal Standards in Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an in depth study of the ethical and legal standards of the American Counseling Association and related entities, and application of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling.

PSY-618
Social & Cultural Foundations of Cnsl
Credit Hours: 2

This course provides an understanding of the cultural context of relationships, issues and trends in a multicultural and diverse society related to such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation,mental and physical characteristics, education, family values, religious and spiritual values, socioeconomic status and unique characteristics of individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups, and communities.?

PSY-619
Psych Issues for Special Needs Populat
Credit Hours: 3

This course will address counseling strategies and interventions designed to assist school-aged children with an emphasis on special needs populations. The course is designed to help students develop skills in interviewing, effective communication and rapport building essential to the therapeutic relationship.

PSY-620
Helping Relationship in Cnsl
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides a broad understanding of the philosophic bases of the helping processes, basic and advanced helping skills and client and helper self-understanding and self-development. Students will also learn counselor characteristics and behaviors that influence the helping processes including age, gender, and ethnic differences, verbal and nonverbal behaviors and personal characteristics, orientation and skills.

MCPS-627
Psych Applications of Ethical Issues
Credit Hours: 2

Psychological applications of ethical issues, e.g., confidentiality and disclosure, informed consent, human rights, leadership and power, and professional ethics will be studied through case analysis, role play and simulations.

PSY-630
Behavior Modification and Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course focuses on the principles and procedures of behavior modification for weight management. Students will develop theoretical and practical knowledge in the following areas as applied to weight management: observing and recording; recognizing instances of reinforcement extinction and punishment and their likely long-term effects; interpreting behavioral episodes relevant to weight management in terms of behavioral principles and procedures; and designing, implementing and evaluating behavior modification programs for weight management for individuals and groups. Pre-requisite: Psy 620

MCPS-631
Psych Applications of Social Issues
Credit Hours: 2

Psychological applications of social issues, e.g., community, multiculturalism, families, life style and health issues, and service delivery systems will be studied.

PSY-631
Research Methods & Program Evaluation
Credit Hours: 3

A study of research methods used in psychology with a focus on applied, clinically-oriented research. Students will study methods of outcome assessment and program evaluation. Throughout the course, students will have experience reading and evaluating research.An original research study will also be conducted. Prerequisite: undergraduate statistics and research methods in psychology.

PSY-633
Counseling Theory & Methods I
Credit Hours: 3

Major contemporary counseling theories and their application in a variety of counseling interventions will be studied and practiced. Focus will be on the development of basic and advanced counseling skills and procedures and refinement of the skills needed in providing counseling interventions. Prerequisites: MC 620 or PSY 620.

PSY-634
Counseling Theory & Methods II
Credit Hours: 3

A study of counseling as a formof professional assistance in problems of development and adjustment. Provides the basic skills necessary for effective interaction and communication in a variety of situations,with the emphasis on individual counseling. Includes practical experiences such as role playing,audiotaping, and videotaping, critiquing, and test interpretation. Research on the effectiveness of techniques andmodels of counseling will be emphasized.Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-635
Assessment & Evaluation In Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course will be taken for 4 credits for students in themental health counseling specialty and 3 credits for students in the school counseling and student affairs specialty.A comprehensive survey of individual and group approaches to assessment,evaluation,and measurement as they apply to counseling.Discussion of historical perspectives, theoretical bases of assessment, standardized and non-standardized assessment, concepts of statisticalmeasurement, reliability and validity,assessment of special populations, andmulticultural issues, and ethical and legal guidelines. Additionally,didactic knowledge of practical experience in selecting, administering,and interpreting assessment tools that measure intelligence,psychological health and pathology,personality, career options, and academic achievement.

PSY-636
Personality Assessment
Credit Hours: 3

Principles of measurement and assessment of personality. Counseling use of a variety of assessment instruments regarding personality functioning, both normal and abnormal. Projective and objective measures of personality will be studied. Prerequisites: PSY 635.

PSY-637
Group Dynamics & Interpersonal Comm
Credit Hours: 3

A critical examination of the processes operating in various types of groups. Emphasis on social and psychological principles relevant to individuals in groups, and on developing effective group consultation skills. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-639
Human Growth & Personality Development
Credit Hours: 3

A comprehensive review of theories andmethodologies in developmental psychology.Topics include changes that occur with age in cognition and perception,but emphasis is placed on social and personality development. Models of social and personality development are critically discussed in light of their research support and application to counseling.

PSY-641
Psychopathology & Diagnosis
Credit Hours: 3

An examination of abnormal behavior, including an introduction to the etiology,diagnosis, and treatment of psychological dysfunctioning. This course will be an in-depth analysis of psychopathologies as they relate to the use of current diagnostic systems as a formulation for classification of disorders and choice of appropriate treatment. The student will acquire a working knowledge of the DSM, including itsmultiaxial classification system, and will develop the ability to diagnose the variousmental disorders on the basis of a comprehensive diagnostic interview. No prerequisite required.

PSY-642
Treatment Planning
Credit Hours: 3

Building on the knowledge developed in psychopathology and diagnosis, this course provides students the ability to conceptualize client presentation and select appropriate counseling interventions.Skills taught involve establishing appropriate counseling goals,designing intervention strategies,evaluating client outcome, and successfully terminating the counselor-client relationship. Prerequisite: PSY 641.

PSY-643
Career Dev & Occupational Opportunities
Credit Hours: 3

An examination of the theories,processes, and determinants of vocational choice and adjustment. Life stages and career patterns in personal and vocational development will be explored. Occupational structure and trends; job and worker analysis;occupational classifications; sources of occupational and educational information for use in guidance, counseling, personnel selection, and career development programs will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 635.

PSY-645
Family & Marriage Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course will focus on a theory and practice approach, viewing the couple or family as a unitary psychosocial system, focusing on general functioning,dysfunction,and intervention. In contrast to viewing individuals as the locus of a problem, the relationship is seen as a unitary systemwhere harmony and difficulty depend on characteristics of the unit as a whole. Major areas covered include history, theory,practicemodels, and intervention techniques. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-647
Counseling of the Aged
Credit Hours: 3

This course will develop an understanding of the physical and psychological changes associated with aging. Factors associated with lifestyle changes for the aged will be considered with a focus on how to help individuals and families cope with successful aging. Provides the helping professional with specific counseling skills required for working with the aged. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-649
Health & Wellness Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

The purpose of this course is to examine the physical,mental, emotional and social issues relative to health and wellness. Survey of counseling techniques through case study analysis involving a holistic approach to developing a personal,healthy life style. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-651
Substance Abuse Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course is a survey of counseling interventionmodels with substance-abusing clients including treatment approaches and philosophies, individual,group, family, therapeutic communities, Alcoholics Anonymous, residential treatment,outpatient approaches and comparative theories. The course is designed to assist students in identifying and becoming familiar with current counseling approaches and interventionmodels in chemical dependency treatment; to assist the development of the counselor to distinguish between approaches, and to determine treatment selections for various case situations. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-653
Multicultural Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course will focus on the role of culture in counseling and the skills necessary for counselors to work effectively in our contemporary, culturally pluralistic world. Students will study issues and concepts of cross-cultural counseling common tomost culturally different groups in the United States, as well as study guidelines andmethods for counseling specificminority groups. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-655
Women in Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

Course will examine the special needs of women in counseling/ therapy both in theory and practice while evaluating traditional and feminist strategies and/or theories of application. Issues to be explored from both an individual and group perspective include: rape and date rape, domestic violence, hormonal changes and development, confronting life-threatening illness, assertiveness and communication in relationships, work and mothering as well as other current concerns in the ever changing development of women?s lives. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-657
Human Sexuality
Credit Hours: 3

Examination of human sexuality from three perspectives: physiological, clinical and social. The impact of health and social issues related to human sexuality in health and illnesses are presented. Clinical techniques and therapeutic tools, research on outcome, special clinical problems as well as theoretical parameters on sexual functioning and marital relationship will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-659
Counseling Children & Adolescents
Credit Hours: 3

This course will address the disorders and difficulties of children and adolescents and the treatment of these disorders. The course will include the process, theories, techniques and materials used in counseling children and adolescents. Individual, group and family intervention techniques will be emphasized as well as legal and ethical considerations. Strategies presented can be used in a variety of settings. Multicultural considerations are addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-660
Counseling & Spirituality
Credit Hours: 3

This course will introduce the major theories, methods, thinkers, and trends in the field of religion as they pertain to counseling. The first part of the course will concentrate on the theoretical and research areas of the field, with a specific focus on the role of spirituality in physical and mental health. The second part will focus on the integration of spirituality in the therapeutic context, covering such topics as conduction of a genogram with respect to spirituality and ways of incorporating spirituality into treatment planning. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-662
Bereavement Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course will include a presentation of bereavement counseling, interventions that are appropriate for special populations and atypical losses (for example suicide). Students will be encouraged to examine their own attitudes toward loss and history of personal issues. Prerequisite: PSY 633.

PSY-663
Sports Psychology
Credit Hours: 3

This course will provide an overview of counseling issues for athletes, teams, and performance enthusiasts. Students will study issues and concepts related to motivation, stress management, and performance enhancement. Issues associated with career transitions and athletes are discussed. The course examines the physical,mental, emotional, and social issues relative to exercise performance as a component of a healthy lifestyle and provides additional understanding of behavior change strategies that foster the development of a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisite: None.

PSY-671
Counseling Theory & Methods III- Practic
Credit Hours: 3

Closely supervised therapeutic counseling with individuals, translation of theory into practice, clinical and professional techniques and issues. Students must complete the practicum application form prior to registration for the practicum. Prerequisites: Vary by program. Pass/No Credit.

PSY-675
Community Agencies & Resources
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an orientation to the resources and services available in schools, clinics, hospitals, rehabilitation and employment settings and other public and private agencies serving psychologically and physically disabled individuals and their families. Instructional modes will include discussion, research and field-based projects.

PSY-680
Intro to Student Affairs in Higher Educ
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an in-depth introduction to the profession of student affairs and the division?s importance in Higher Education Administration. The historical and philosophical development of the Student Affairs Profession will be explored and discussed. Major topics include an in-depth study of the departments that typically constitute the Division of Student Affairs. This includes history, function, trends, issues and significant personnel. Class will be presented in seminar form.

PSY-682
American College Student
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an overview of the nature of the American college student population, trends in matriculation, demographic, economic, and social variables relating to matriculation and the impact that the college experience has on students. The characteristics of the contemporary American college student will be examined. Major topics will include an examination of the motivations for entering institutions of higher education, developmental theory related to college students, demographic data that describes the contemporary student, problems and challenges specific to the American concept of making higher education accessible to a large percentage of the population, ant the impact of contemporary economic and social trends on the college population.

PSY-683
Special Topics
Credit Hours: 3

An in-depth exploration of a specific topic that is of current interest to graduate students in psychology.Approval of the Program Director is required to register.

PSY-685
Independent Study
Credit Hours: 3

Independent study, research or practice in areas relative to the field of counseling psychology.

PSY-691
Counseling Theory & Methods IV
Credit Hours: 3

The field experience is designed to provide students with practical experience in an applied setting under the supervision of qualified mental health professionals. This will involve the application of theory to counseling psychology practice with individuals, groups, families, children, or adolescents in an approved agency setting. Students must complete the field experience application form prior to registration. Prerequisite: PSY 671.Pass/No Credit.

PSY-693
Counseling Theory & Methods V
Credit Hours: 3

The field experience is designed to provide students with practical experience in an applied setting under the supervision of qualified mental health professionals. This will involve the application of theory to counseling psychology practice with individuals, groups, families, children, or adolescents in an approved agency setting. Students must complete the field experience application form prior to registration. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in PSY 691. Pass/No Credit.

PSY-695
Professional Portfolio
Credit Hours: 0

Advisement regarding organization, developing a?theme?, writing and presenting the professional portfolio.

PSY-697
Culminating Requirem
Credit Hours: 0

PSY-699
Thesis
Credit Hours: 3

Course Level: 7

PSY-700
Clinical Applications of Human Develop
Credit Hours: 3

This course traces human development throughout the life span, including prenatal, infancy, toddlerhood, childhood, adolescence and adulthood. The goal of the course is the acquisition of knowledge of clinical applications of observable developmental milestones for each era, within the traditional domains of behavior (i.e., cognitive, social/relational, emotional, motivational and physical/biological).

PSY-702
Reccent and Adv Theories of Personalit
Credit Hours: 3

Critically examines and compares recent personality theories that recognize cultural diversity. Readings from original sources emphasize scientific research and professional applications. A particular focus will be placed on those theories that illuminate social justice concerns and/or health and positive psychology.

PSY-705
Human Learning
Credit Hours: 3

This course will explore theoretical and empirical research related to learning, cognition and cognitive development. Topics include areas such as memory, attention, problem solving, concept formation, and language. These topics will be covered in the overall context of learning theory and emphasis will be placed on how they can be applied to psychotherapy.

PSY-706
Physiological Psychology
Credit Hours: 3

The physiological basis of behavior is examined by studying brain mechanisms including sensory processes, motor systems, awareness, memory, learning, sleep, arousal, and motivation. The role of hormones, biological clocks, and drugs as they affect human behavior is stressed. Neural maturation, neural plasticity, neurogenesis, the aging process, and mental illness will be studied.

PSY-708
History and Systems Psychology
Credit Hours: 3

This course covers the historical roots and development of the discipline of psychology. Principles of the classical schools of Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Gestalt Psychology, and Psychoanalysis are presented and compared, with emphasis on their relevance and contributions to contemporary theoretical systems of psychology. The course includes a discussion of the history of applied psychology focusing in particular on the development of specialties such as Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology.

PSY-710
Advanced Personality Assessment
Credit Hours: 3

This course explores the theoretical bases of personality assessment as well as the use of psychological instruments in the objective and projective assessment of personality traits and characteristics. Students will develop a thorough understanding of psychological testing and measurement principles as applied to personality assessment. Concepts include, but are not limited to reliability, validity, utility, error, bias, group norms, standardization, item analysis and principles and practices in test development. Assessment instruments include, but are not limited to CPI, MMPI-2, MMPI-2-RF, AND MCMI-III, as well as selected projective measures. The impact of culture on personality assessment, methods of incorporating personality test results into psychological reports, and ethical issues pertaining to personality assessment will be examined. Students will have extensive practice in administering, scoring and interpretation of personality assessment instruments.

PSY-712
CognitiveNeuropsychologicalAssessment
Credit Hours: 3

This course involves extensive practice in the administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of the most commonly used clinical instruments for psychological evaluation of intelligence, cognitive and neuropsychological functioning. Students will develop a thorough understanding of psychological testing and measurement principles as applied to cognitive and neuropsychological assessment. Concepts include, but not limited to reliability, validity, utility error, bias, group norms, standardization, item analysis and principles and practices in test development. Assessment instruments include, but not limited to the WAIS-IV, WISC-IV, KAIT, Stanford-Binet 5, WCST, and the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery. Development of rapport, interviewing skills, and structured history-taking are also included.

PSY-714
Adv Child and Adolescent Psycopathology
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines psychopathology from infancy through adolescence. Developmental psychopathology, including the role of time and change in childhood disturbances, is an important focus of the class. The following areas are examined: clinical assessment of psychosocial problems in childhood; diagnostic systems for conceptualizing childhood psychopathology; and understanding disturbances of childhood from a biopsychosocial perspective.

PSY-716
Advanced Adult Psychopathology
Credit Hours: 3

Reviews the major categories of adult psychopathology as described in the current DSM. The focus of the course is on the issues of symptomatology, etiology, prognosis, and psychosocial and psychopharmacological treatment. Current research data are integrated with practical issues of multidisciplinary case management.

PSY-719
Foundations of Counseling Psychology
Credit Hours: 3

This course explores the theoretical and empirical bases of counseling psychology as well as the legal and ethical dimensions of the professional practice of counseling psychology. The student will acquire an understanding of the application of psychological principles in fostering physical and mental health in psychotherapeutic and psychoeducational settings. Legal and ethical topics will include confidentiality, informed consent, maintaining professional boundaries, as well as issues related to licensure and professional development.

PSY-720
Techniques in Counsel Psychotherapy
Credit Hours: 3

Prepares students to conduct individual counseling and psychotherapy from cognitive-behavioral, humanistic/existential, and positive psychological perspectives. Emphasis is on philosophical and historical foundations. Specific topics include cognitive-behavioral case conceptualization and intervention techniques, as well as humanistic/existential and positive psychological issues such as the development of the therapeutic relationship, facilitating client growth, the development of meaning and purpose, and the fostering self-identity and self-actualization.

PSY-722
Theories and Techniques of Career Couns
Credit Hours: 3

The course will focus on the application of career counseling theories to individual and group career counseling. Students will acquire familiarity with specific career assessment instruments. In addition, the course will cover the development, planning, implementing and management of comprehensive career development programs in a variety of settings. Legal and ethical issues of career counseling and the use of technology to assist individuals in career planning will also be covered.

PSY-726
App Soc Jus Psycological Treatment
Credit Hours: 3

This course will explore how the foundational value of social justice can be implemented in psychological treatment. Techniques to enhance client empowerment will be reviewed, particularly as they pertain to working with socioeconomically and culturally disadvantaged and stigmatized clients. Topics will include client resilience, self-efficacy, assertiveness, and self-advocacy.

PSY-728
Adv Res Meth Statistical Design
Credit Hours: 3

The primary goal of this course is for students to gain familiarity with common data analytic strategies relevant to empirical research in psychology. The emphasis is on understanding the analyses as they are presented in academic journals so that students are informed consumers of the literature. The relationship between research questions, hypotheses, methodology, levels of measurement, and choice of appropriate analyses is emphasized. Analyses to be covered include ANOVA models, nonparametric statistics, measures of association, multiple regression, logistic regression, factor analysis, path analysis, and various qualitative analytic strategies.

PSY-730
Counseling Research Program Eval Res
Credit Hours: 3

This course explores the variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods and designs most frequently used in research relevant to clinical practice. These include randomized clinical trials, quasi experimental research, case control studies, descriptive research, psychometric studies, meta-analytic studies, case study research, and program evaluation research. Attention will be given to issues of cultural diversity in research, research validity, and the link between science and practice.

PSY-731
Program Mgt Consultation Supv for CPSY
Credit Hours: 2

This course explores how counseling psychologists can develop, administer, and evaluate effective mental health programs. Students will also be introduced to theories and techniques of counselor supervision.

PSY-732
Doctoral Practicum I
Credit Hours: 3

Students are engaged in clinical activity in field placements, and meet on campus to discuss cases and professional issues with the practicum instructor and other students. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all first year courses.

PSY-733
Doctoral Practicum II
Credit Hours: 3

A continuation of PSY 732: Doctoral Practicum I. Prerequisite: PSY 732.

PSY-734
Doctoral Practicum III
Credit Hours: 3

A continuation of PSY 733: Doctoral Practicum II. Prerequisite: PSY 733.

PSY-735
Doctoral Practicum IV
Credit Hours: 3

A continuation of PSY 734: Doctoral Practicum III. Prerequisite: PSY 734.

PSY-736
Doctoral Internship I
Credit Hours: 3

An individually arranged and committee approved pre-doctoral internship, including experience in a clinical setting working with clients under supervision, and engaging in other professionally related activities. Prerequisite PSY 735.

PSY-738
Doctoral Internship II
Credit Hours: 3

A continuation of PSY 736: Doctoral Internship I. Prerequisite PSY 736.

PSY-740
Doctoral Project I
Credit Hours: 1

The Doctoral Project provides an opportunity for the consolidation of the student?s knowledge and understanding of current research and thought in counseling psychology, and to demonstrate the student?s own professional development. The project is initiated by the student under the guidance of the student?s Doctoral Project Committee. The Committee is comprised of three members: a chairperson and member selected from among the program faculty, and a third member who may be either from the College faculty or from the professional community.

PSY-742
Doctoral Project II
Credit Hours: 1

A continuation of PSY 740: Doctoral Project I. Prerequisite PSY 740.

PSY-744
Doctoral Project III
Credit Hours: 3

A continuation of PSY 742: Doctoral Project II. Prerequisite PSY 742.

PSY-746
Doctoral Project IV
Credit Hours: 3

A continuation of PSY 744: Doctoral Project III. Prerequisite PSY 744.

Who We Are

Founded in 1899 by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth, the College of Saint Elizabeth has a strong tradition of concern for the poor, for developing leadership in a spirit of service and social responsibility, and a commitment to the promotion of women as full partners in society.

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College of Saint Elizabeth
2 Convent Road
Morristown, NJ 07960-6989
973-290-4000

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