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Contact Information

Undergraduate
David H. Aussicker

Phone: (973) 290-4085
Email: daussicker@cse.edu
Office: Santa Maria Hall
Lower Level

Graduate
James F. Ford, Ph.D.

Phone: (973) 290-4324
Email: jford@cse.edu
Office: Santa Maria Hall
Lower Level

Justice Studies (Criminal Justice)

Program Overview

In keeping with the mission and values of the College of Saint Elizabeth, the Justice Studies (Criminal Justice) Program provides students with the scholarship and proficiency necessary to be successful working in key aspects of the legal and criminal justice system including victim advocacy or to pursue graduate study in these areas.

The Justice Studies major is a multidisciplinary program that draws on the strong liberal arts tradition of the College. The program aims to provide students with a broad but intensive understanding and appreciation of the important social, ethical, political, and cultural issues pertinent to criminal justice and the law. The program is carefully designed to meet the needs and expectations of both full-time and part-time students, as well as professionals working in the criminal justice field who want to continue and/or update their studies.

Graduates

Students graduating with a degree in Justice Studies are furnished with the ability and the capacity to succeed in the Criminal Justice and related fields. Students are prepared for advanced educational pursuits in graduate and professional institutions. The graduates of CSE's Justice Studies Program work in a variety of fields. These include:

  • Business security
  • Corrections
  • Law enforcement
  • Parole
  • Practice of law
  • Probation
  • Victim and child advocacy

Requirements

B.A. in Justice Studies (Criminal Justice)

  • JUS101 Introduction to Justice Studies (2)
  • JUS211 Correction Services (4)
  • JUS215 Judicial Processes (4)
  • JUS251 Law Enforcement (4)
  • PS221 Law and Contemporary American Society (4)
  • JUS425 Senior Capstone Seminar (2)

Total: 20 credits

Elective Courses
Students must select THREE (3) elective courses TWO (2) of which must be 300-level or above.*

  • JUS201 Women in the Criminal Justice System (4)
  • JUS205 Criminal Investigation (4)
  • JUS210 Legal Research and Writing (4)
  • JUS221 Criminal Law (4)
  • JUS231 Criminal Procedure (4)
  • JUS241 Public Policy and Administration (4)
  • JUS301 Juvenile Law and Justice (4)
  • JUS305 Public Safety Leadership and Supervision (4)
  • JUS311 Intimate Violence (4)
  • JUS325 Victimology (4)
  • JUS327 Victim Law and Services (4)
  • JUS341 Women and the Law (4)
  • JUS405 Research Methods in Justice Studies (4)
  • JUS490 Special Topics in Justice Studies (4)
  • JUS491 Independent Study (4)

Total: 12 credits

*It is highly recommended that students take JUS405 if they intend to apply to graduate school. JUS495 Internship may not fulfill an elective slot.

Total: 32 credits

Students who wish to apply to the BA/MA combined program will need to complete the following pre-requisite undergraduate courses:

  • JUS305 Public Safety and Management
  • JUS325 Victimology
  • JUS405 Research Methods in Justice Studies

Minor/Concentration in Justice Studies (Criminal Justice)

Required Courses

  • JUS101 Introduction to Justice Studies (2)
  • PS221 Law and Contemporary American Society (4)

Total: 6 credits

Three (3) Elective Courses. One (1) must be in the 300-level or above.

  • JUS Elective (4)
  • JUS Elective (4)
  • JUS 300-level Elective (4)

Total: 12 credits

Cumulative Total: 18 credits

Elective Courses

  • JUS201 Women in the Criminal Justice System (4)
  • JUS205 Criminal Investigation (4)
  • JUS210 Legal Research and Writing (4)
  • JUS215 Judicial Processes (4)
  • JUS221 Criminal Law (4)
  • JUS231 Criminal Procedure (4)
  • JUS241 Public Policy and Administration (4)
  • JUS301 Juvenile Law and Justice (4)
  • JUS305 Public Safety Leadership and Supervision (4)
  • JUS311 Intimate Violence (4)
  • JUS325 Victimology (4)
  • JUS327 Victim Law and Services (4)
  • JUS341 Women and the Law (4)
  • JUS405 Research Methods in Justice Studies (4)
  • JUS490 Special Topics in Justice Studies (4)
  • JUS491 Independent Study (4)

Minor/Concentration in Victim Services

  • JUS325 Victimology (4)
  • JUS327 Victim Law and Services (4)
  • PSY219 Crisis Intervention (2)
  • JUS495 Internship (2)
  • One (1) Elective Course from the following:
    • JUS215 Judicial Processes (4)
    • JUS311 Intimate Violence (4)
    • SOC201 Social Problems (4)

Total: 16 credits

M.A. in Justice Administration and Public Service

Applicants must have:

  • Earned a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university with a 3.00 average or better on a 4.0 scale;
  • A record of academic success in prior undergraduate courses;
  • Two letters of recommendation attesting to the candidate's ability to perform a high level of academic work as a self-directed learner and to his/her good character. One letter should be from someone who has worked with or supervised the candidate;
  • A successful interview with a faculty member in person or via phone or webcam;
  • A writing sample will be submitted by the student at the time of the interview;
  • Demonstrated competence in technical knowledge as it relates to participating successfully in the online environment.

Graduate Advisement

Upon being accepted into the M.A. in Justice Administration and Public Service Program, a student will be assigned a graduate advisor, who will help plan out the student's course of study. This advisement can take place via the phone or webcam, or if the student resides in proximity to the College then the student and advisor can choose to meet in person.

Program Options

Online, Blended, or Traditional Online Format

Program Requirements

The M.A. in Justice Administration and Public Service consists of 6 required courses and 4 elective courses for a total of 30 credits. The courses are as follows:

Required Courses (18 credits)

  • JUS650 Justice Administration (3)
  • JUS655 Justice Policy and Planning (3)
  • JUS660 Victimization and Justice (3)
  • MC626 Ethical Issues in Human Services Leadership (3)
  • JUS682 Research Methods (3)
  • JUS690 Capstone Seminar/Experience (3)

Elective Courses

  • JUS620 Law and to Legal Systems (3)
  • JUS665 Legal and Critical Issues in Justice Studies (3)
  • JUS670 Management in Justice Administration (3)
  • JUS675 Cyber Crime, Security and the Law (3)
  • JUS680 Investigation and Digital Evidence (3)
  • JUS683 Special Topics (3).
  • JUS685 Independent Study (1-3)
  • GST650 Continuous Enrollment (1)

Combined Baccalaureate to Master's Degree Program

The Combined Baccalaureate to Master's Degree Program enables highly motivated undergraduate students to transition into the graduate Justice Administration and Public Service program even while still completing the College's baccalaureate program. The Program requires candidates to complete as pre-requisites three of the four undergraduate courses listed below, as well as a series of selected graduate-level courses. To be eligible for the Combined Baccalaureate to Master's Degree Program, students must achieve a 3.0 or higher grade point average.

Qualified students, after successfully completing their junior year, may apply to take three designated graduate courses (9 credits), which can be applied as free electives toward the completion of their undergraduate program and/or toward the 30-credit requirement for the Master's Degree in Justice Administration and Public Service. Combined degree students must continue in the master's program without interruption until completion or risk being dropped. Combined degree students must apply and be granted a leave of absence in order to interrupt their studies.

Prerequisites

  • PS241 Public Policy and Administration (3), or
  • JUS305 Public Safety Management (4)
  • JUS405 Research for Justice Studies Majors (3)
  • JUS325 Victimology (3)

Graduate Courses

  • MC626 Ethical Issues (3)
  • JUS650 Justice Administration (3)
  • JUS655 Policy and Planning (3)

Course Listing

Course Level: 1

JUS-101
Introduction to Justice Studies*
Credit Hours: 2

This course provides foundational information, concepts, issues, and ideas critical to the field of justice studies. In preparation for future study in either of the Major's two Tracks, the fundamentals of the U.S. criminal-justice and legal systems are examined. Students will discuss and analyze the importance and meaning of ethics and justice as a component of societal cohesion and stability.

Course Level: 2

JUS-201
Women & the Criminal Justice System
Credit Hours: 4

Employing both historical and contemporary perspectives, this course examines the ways in which women interact with the U.S. criminal-justice system. Women and criminal behavior, women in correctional facilities, and the expanding opportunities women have for careers as criminal-justice professionals are among the topics reviewed.

JUS-205
Criminal Investigation
Credit Hours: 4

The student will be able to discuss and describe the fundamentals of criminal investigation by defining the responsibilities of a criminal investigator. How to collect, develop, and interpret physical evidence. The student will be able to cite numerous methods of obtaining information from people and records. The student will be able to outline the proper procedure in surveillance, eyewitness identification, as well as guidelines and techniques for interrogation. Also, the impact of forensic science and cyber crimes on criminal investigations will be discussed. Prerequisite: JUS 101.

JUS-210
Legal Research and Writing
Credit Hours: 4

This course will focus on the basic legal research techniques and examine numerous judicial decisions, statutes, administrative regulations and digests. Emphasis will be placed on legal writing and research, terminology, including legal forms and document formatting. The rudiments of oral advocacy will be covered.

JUS-211
The Corrections System
Credit Hours: 4

This course surveys the principal issues, institutions, policies, and programs pertaining to the U.S. corrections system. Prison procedures, institutional treatment methods, prisoners' rights, parole, probation, community-based initiatives, and contemporary corrections innovations will be explored and evaluated. Restorative justice will be discussed.

JUS-215
Judicial Processes
Credit Hours: 4

This course provides the student with a comprehensive study of the state and federal court systems and the impact those systems have on the Criminal Justice System and American politics.

JUS-221
Criminal Law
Credit Hours: 4

Criminal Law is the study of the major felonies including murder, robbery, rape, arson, burglary, assault and battery and larceny, as well as the defenses of insanity, incapacity, and immaturity. The course will also include a study of the specific intent crimes, general intent, the concept of actus reus, and the impact the war on terror has had on the Constitution and due process.

JUS-231
Criminal Procedure
Credit Hours: 4

Criminal procedure is the study of the various procedural rules required by the Constitution and statutes in criminal cases. The concepts of probable cause, lawful interrogation, search and seizure and other requirements of due process, as well as how these are implemented, will be included. The course will also include what the impact of the war on terror has had on the Constitution and due process.

JUS-241
Public Policy & Administration
Credit Hours: 4

This course introduces the student to major areas of public administration. These include the development and implementation of public-sector policy, regulatory action, budgeting, federalism as it relates to the policymaking process, agency law, and criminal-justice administration.

JUS-251
Law Enforcement
Credit Hours: 4

This course presents a basic overview of police operations and procedures. The history of American law enforcement is briefly reviewed, as background to a fuller discussion of the structure, scope, and routines of contemporary police administrations. A variety of related topics are also discussed, including the impact of Homeland Security, the duties and obligations of law-enforcement officers, the need for police officials to maintain good community relations and exceptionally high standards of ethics, the expanding role of women in the law-enforcement profession, and the special demands and challenges encountered by today's police officers.

Course Level: 3

JUS-301
Juvenile Law & Justice
Credit Hours: 4

This course examines the main components of the American juvenile justice system. An historical overview of the system is provided, and relevant case law is reviewed. Theories of adolescent personality development and behavior, adolescent subcultures, delinquency prevention, and treatment methods are among the topics considered

JUS-305
Public Safety Leadership & Supervision
Credit Hours: 4

This course exposes students to a broad range of ideas, commitments, ethics, theories, and concepts relating to leadership in the criminal justice profession. Topics focus on the strategies that effective leaders use to manage their employee relationships. The course stresses the application of leadership principles to criminal justice situations and problems. A focus on Homeland Security is also included.

JUS-311
Intimate Violence
Credit Hours: 4

This course acquaints students with recent studies and scholarship pertaining to violent behavior that occurs in familial or close-relationship contexts. The psychological impetus for such conduct and the behavioral syndromes most closely identified with this unlawful behavior will be reviewed, as will offender and victim profiles of those most likely to be involved in domestic violence. Relevant case law and case studies will be examined, as will the role of social agencies established to combat this societal problem.

JUS-325
Victimology
Credit Hours: 4

This course introduces the student to the principles, concepts, and theories of victimology, analysis of victimization patters and trends, and responses to criminal victimization. Students will further study and contemplate a variety of questions and issues, including the levels of victimization in specific criminal circumstances, the social and psychological impact of crime upon victims.

JUS-327
Victim Law & Services
Credit Hours: 4

This course reviews the laws, court procedures, and support services that address the rights and needs of crime victims using a case-study approach. Subjects covered include the statutory protections available to victims, restitution and the proper role of victims in the sentencing phase of the adjudication process. Also examined are the responsibilities of police and the criminal justice bureaucracy in their interactions with victims and the victim service programs provided by government agencies and community assistance groups. An emphasis on specific court cases concerning New Jersey law will be stressed.

JUS-341
Women & the Law
Credit Hours: 4

This course examines the status of women under American law, both historically and in a contemporary context. Topics reviewed include Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, workplace issues as they affect women, significant case law relating to women, and other legal issues of concern to women. The opportunities available for women in today's legal profession are also discussed. This course also explores important legal issues and principles pertaining to family life and the family unit. Parental rights and responsibilities, children's rights, divorce, child custody, and adoption are among the subjects considered.

Course Level: 4

JUS-405
Research Methods in Justice Studies
Credit Hours: 4

The students will be exposed to scientific paradigms, research designs, methods, and analysis used in social sciences research. The course will help students develop critical thinking and an understanding of ethical and political issues in the practice of social research. Students will be required to develop a research proposal. Prerequisite: Math 119 Elementary Statistics

JUS-425
Senior Seminar
Credit Hours: 2

This course seeks to provide a capstone experience for Justice Studies Majors. Class readings will include theoretical, specialized, and analytical perspectives and subject matter applicable to advanced study in this field. In addition, under the instructor's supervision each student will complete an appropriate research assignment that will be discussed and reviewed by the full class at the conclusion of the Seminar.

JUS-490
Special Topics in Justice Studies
Credit Hours: 4

Offered occasionally, this course provides an opportunity for close analysis of a justice studies topic of interest to students and faculty.

JUS-491
Independent Study
Credit Hours: 3

An in-depth, faculty-supervised investigation of an appropriate topic of particular interest to the student.

JUS-495
Internship
Credit Hours: 3

In consultation with a faculty supervisor, the student selects an appropriate placement site and completes an internship project. Program Chairperson approval must be obtained in advance of scheduling an internship for course credit. To obtain such approval, the student must demonstrate that the project will provide experience and perspectives applicable to the field of justice studies. 1 - 4 credits.

Course Level: 6

JUS-620
Law and Legal System
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides foundational information, concepts, and ideas critical to the fields of law and the criminal justice system. Included will be basic understanding of the criminal and legal systems with a focus on the structure of government and procedural issues relating to the administration of justice. It is the intention of this course to give the student a basic understanding and appreciation of the impact of the legal system as it relates to the discipline of forensic science.

JUS-650
Justice Administration
Credit Hours: 3

This course explores important problems and ethical concerns faced by contemporary management professionals in the field of public safety administration.The planning and organizational strategies most applicable to supervisory functions in this field are examined. Relevant theoretical and research methods will be studied, as will text-case examples of administrative situations regularly encountered in public safety leadership. The unique pressures faced by public justice personnel, and the managerial implications of this stress, also will be discussed.

JUS-655
Justice Policy & Planning
Credit Hours: 3

This course focuses on the development of policy and planning, informed by research data and subjected to rigorous evaluation in public safety agencies. Political and legal problems confronting the policy maker, as well as ethical and moral issues, will be discussed.

JUS-660
Victimization and Justice
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines theories, policies, and research related to the interaction of crime victims and offenders within the justice system. Special attention will be given to individual and community reactions to victimization and victim recovery. Issues related to special categories of victimization will be explored, and current innovative programs offering services and financial remedies for crime victims will be discussed.

JUS-665
Legal and Critical Issues
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines in depth some of the major topics pertinent to the administration of public safety institutions in contemporary America. Public and social policies as they relate to crime, crime prevention, and justice are considered. Community-oriented efforts and problem-solving techniques now used in law enforcement and by other public safety agencies will also be analyzed. Issues will be considered from local, state, and federal perspectives as well as from a global perspective and examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights.

JUS-670
Management in Justice Administration
Credit Hours: 3

This course focuses on administrative issues routinely encountered by public safety agencies. These issues include personnel management, budgeting, and supervision, within the context of the justice studies profession.The problems and challenges specific to public safety administrators also will be considered.

JUS-675
Cyber Crime, Security and the Law
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the growing problem of computer-related crime security and the evolution of criminal law as it confronts new kind of cyber crime. Electronic evidence-gathering and investigative techniques are among the topics considered along with electronic fraud and forgery, corporate espionage, identity theft, online extortion scams, child pornography, and infringement of intellectual property rights. The major federal and state statutes and regulations enacted to combat cyber crime and security will be carefully reviewed, as will the important privacy issues raised by electronic surveillance techniques conducted by law enforcement.

JUS-680
Investigation & Digital Evidence
Credit Hours: 3

This course reviews the most effective investigative procedures for identifying, collecting, preserving, and analyzing criminal evidence obtained from computers or computer networks. The technical and legal aspects of accumulating digital evidence maintained on, or transmitted by computers for use in solving crimes will be examined. The proper methods of preparing such evidence for use in a court of law will also be studied.

JUS-682
Research Methods In Justice Studies
Credit Hours: 3

This course reviews the research designs and quantitative and qualitative methods most appropriate to ethical research, policy evaluation, and policy development in the justice studies profession.The student will demonstrate the ability to review critical literature pertaining to the research project and connect the literature to the research results towards completing the capstone experience.

JUS-683
Special Topics:
Credit Hours: 3

An in-depth exploration of a specific topic that is of current interest to graduate students in management.Approval of the Program Director is required to register.

JUS-690
Capstone Seminar/Experience
Credit Hours: 3

This course, the culminating experience of the program, requires students to complete an original research project grounded in the field of justice studies. Each student will design and complete an action research project that broadens and deepens the student?s awareness and appreciation of the need to apply community base, social justice perspectives to one?s professional endeavors. In completing these projects, students must demonstrate an ability to define, analyze, evaluate, and recommend solutions for resolving an issue, problem, or potential opportunity of interest and importance to the community. Students will periodically share with one another their project goals, challenges, and progress attained. Each student will complete a substantial research paper discussing the objectives, research, and outcomes of his/her project. The project topics and research methods employed will be developed through individual consultations and collaborative discussions with the seminar?s instructor.All projects must receive faculty approval, which will be based on the quality and merit of the student?s proposal, particularly as it relates to and advances the mission of the College of Saint Elizabeth. Pre-requisite:JUS682

Who We Are

Founded in 1899 by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth, the College of Saint Elizabeth has a strong tradition of concern for the poor, for developing leadership in a spirit of service and social responsibility, and a commitment to the promotion of women as full partners in society.

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2 Convent Road
Morristown, NJ 07960-6989
973-290-4000

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