Search
Main Menu
Additional Menu

Contact Information

Marie Boyle, Ph.D., R.D.
Chair, Foods and Nutrition
Phone: (973) 290-4127
Email: mboyle01@cse.edu
Office: Henderson Hall
1st Floor - Room 155

Monica Luby, M.S., R.D.
Didactic Program in Dietetics Director
Phone: (973) 290-4092
Email: mluby@cse.edu
Office: Henderson Hall
1st Floor - Room 152

Foods and Nutrition

Program Overview

Bachelor of Science in Foods and Nutrition

The undergraduate Foods and Nutrition Program is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills for entry into foods, nutrition and dietetics-related professions or advanced study. The curriculum is designed to offer two concentrations. The Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration (ND)* is designed for students who wish to enter the profession of dietetics with the goal of becoming a Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist (RD/RDN). Students who successfully meet degree and Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration requirements receive a verification statement. This provides eligibility to apply to a dietetic internship program. The Dietetic Internship is also required to sit for the credentialing exam to become a Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist. The General Studies in Foods and Nutrition (GSFN) Concentration is designed to allow students more flexibility in planning their career paths. Students are encouraged to combine their FN studies with a minor, offering the opportunity for students to expand their personal interests in other health-related areas such as fitness and wellness, nutrition research, public health or opportunities within the food and pharmaceutical industries.

The Program encourages students to adopt an integrated, holistic approach to understanding the food and nutritional needs of individuals, through a rigorous course of study that provides a strong foundation in the sciences and liberal arts. Emphasis on personal enrichment with leadership, social responsibility, service and ethics within a diverse society is central to the Program's mission.

The Bachelor of Science degree in Foods and Nutrition, Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration is currently granted continuing accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly, the American Dietetic Association ).

*Please note the Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration is also known as a Didactic Program in Dietetics or DPD Program.

Combined Degree Program: B.S. in Foods and Nutrition/M.S. in Nutrition

The College of Saint Elizabeth offers a Combined Degree Program (B.S. in Foods & Nutrition/M.S. in Nutrition) offered through the undergraduate Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration. The M.S. program emphasizes nutrition and health promotion, wellness, leadership, and health advocacy. Eligible undergraduate students can earn both a bachelor's and master's degree in a unique combined program format. Students complete 9 graduate credits in partial fulfillment of the 30 credits required for the M.S. degree in Nutrition during their senior/fourth year of study. These 9 credits also fulfill the ND concentration requirements. Students interested in the B.S./M.S. program option must meet the program's eligibility criteria.

Master of Science in Nutrition

The 30-credit online graduate program in nutrition combines advanced study in nutrition and health promotion with a unique, competency-based curriculum that provides nutrition and health professionals with a broad perspective of current issues in nutrition research and ethics, health promotion and healthy aging, counseling and communications, public health and program planning. The program emphasizes ways to incorporate new research and technology, evidence-based applications, and entrepreneurial skills into the practice of nutrition. The program offers a choice of concentrations in Entrepreneurial Nutrition Practice, Community Nutrition and Wellness as well as a Certificate in Sports Nutrition and Wellness. All core courses and most electives are offered online and it is possible to earn the degree fully online. Some electives and courses in the Certificate in Sports Nutrition and Wellness are offered in a traditional campus setting or in an accelerated conference format on campus.

Nutrition professionals develop skills to assume leadership roles in delivering nutrition and wellness-related services in a variety of settings. The program prepares students for a variety of career opportunities in business, government, health care, and education. Graduates work in private practice, nutrition education, school systems, the food and pharmaceutical industries, clinical and corporate research, community organizations, hospitals, public health agencies, work site wellness and health promotion programs, and fitness facilities.

Combined Masters of Science in Nutrition and Dietetic Internship Program

The Combined M.S. in Nutrition/Dietetic Internship Program (MS/DI) includes 20 credits specific to the Master's in Nutrition and 18 credits specific to the dietetic internship program. Students are accepted into this option through a rigorous application and matching process. Information about application and matching is available at http://www.cse.edu/academics/hsa/foods-and-nutrition/dietetic-internship/application-instructions.dot. Students complete 20 credits of Master's coursework and 18 credits of dietetic internship specific coursework to earn both the M.S. in Nutrition and a verification statement of program completion. Students are then eligible to take the national examination to become a Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist (RD/RDN). The MS/DI Program's Concentration is in Entrepreneurial Nutrition Practice. The Program is designed to ensure training and skills in the practice competencies established for entry-level dietitians.

The Dietetic Internship Program is currently granted continued accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Statement of Accreditation Status

The B.S. in Foods and Nutrition, Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration and the Dietetic Internship Program are currently granted continued accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and are accredited through 2015.

ACEND is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. This recognition affirms that ACEND meets national standards and is a reliable authority on the quality of nutrition and dietetics education programs. ACEND can be contacted at 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606 or www.eatright.org.

Program Goals

Bachelor of Science in Foods in Nutrition

Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration

  • Prepare students for the professional practice of dietetics through a program that meets ACEND Foundation Knowledge Requirements and Learning Outcomes within a multidisciplinary liberal arts curriculum.
  • Integrate learning opportunities for students to develop personal and professional ethics and social responsibility required for dietetics practice.
  • Prepare students with the foundational skills necessary for lifelong learning and to assume roles for continued professional development in dietetics, leadership and service to the community through student advising and active learning experiences.

General Studies in Foods and Nutrition Concentration

  • Prepare students in general studies in foods and nutrition which may be combined with another area of study (i.e., business, communication, allied health, or as entry to pre-medical studies, etc.) for a special career in foods and nutrition, and preparation for graduate studies.
  • Integrate foods and nutrition-related learning opportunities for students to develop qualities of personal and professional ethics, social responsibility, service, leadership and an appreciation for lifelong learning.

Master of Science in Nutrition

  • Demonstrate acquisition of knowledge and the ability to evaluate and communicate nutrition information through completion of a capstone experience.
  • Demonstrate attributes of professional development to be effective and productive citizens and life-long learners in a global society.
  • Promote professional leadership and ethical practice in a spirit of service to the community.

Dietetic Internship Program

  • Increase readiness for supervised practice through MS coursework that increases students' core knowledge, critical thinking and professional confidence.
  • Prepare students for entry level positions in dietetics meeting the Core Competencies for the RD/RDN as established by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND).
  • Promote evidence-based practice with an emphasis on acquisition of knowledge and practice skills specific to the Entrepreneurial Nutrition Practice Concentration.
  • Provide a supportive environment in which students develop leadership and professional dietetic practice knowledge and skills through self-assessment of competence, initiation of draft professional portfolio and completion of capstone portfolio.
  • Promote ethical practice in a spirit of service and social responsibility.

Graduates

The professional field of foods, nutrition and dietetics is a dynamic career choice in today's health and consumer oriented society. This field offers the potential for a wide variety of employment options within the food industry, communications and health-related fields.

Our graduates have developed successful careers in healthcare and the pharmaceutical industry, the food industry as regulatory affairs specialists or as supermarket specialists, in communications as food writers, in education, community and public health agencies, and in the areas of nutrition counseling, corporate wellness, personal health, lifestyle motivation, and fitness.

Many graduates complete their program requirements to become Registered Dietitians/Nutritionists. As RD/RDNs they are highly trained and qualified to offer specialized, in-depth medical nutrition and preventive nutritional care to patients and clients. For more information on careers in dietetics please see the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website at www.eatright.org.

Requirements

B.S. in Foods and Nutrition

The undergraduate Foods and Nutrition Program offers two concentrations. The Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration (ND), also known as the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) is designed for students who wish to enter the profession of dietetics with the goal of becoming a Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist (RD/RDN). The General Studies in Foods and Nutrition (GSFN) is designed to allow students more flexibility in planning their career path. Students are encouraged to combine their FN studies with a minor, offering the opportunity for students to expand their personal interests in other health-related areas such as fitness and wellness, nutrition research, public health or opportunities within the food and pharmaceutical industries.

Additional offerings through the ND Concentration: The FN Program offers a combined degree B.S./M.S. program. For returning students, the ND concentration also offers two routes for students to earn an ACEND DPD Verification Statement. Students may fall under one of the two options: Second degree option for the ND Concentration or the Special Conditions - Didactic Program in Dietetics Verification Statement. Please see below.

Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration Core Requirements

  • FN100 Professional Preparation (1)
  • FN200 Introduction to Food Science w/Lab (4)
  • FN210 Basic Human Nutrition (4)
  • FN235 Methods of Nutrition Education (4)
  • FN300 Food Production Systems w/Lab (4)
  • FN320 Nutritional Biochemistry I (4)*
  • FN323 Nutrition in the Life Cycle (4)
  • FN325 Nutritional Biochemistry II (4)
  • FN400 Professional Practice in Dietetics, Foods and Nutrition (1)
  • FN405 Food Science and Experimental Foods w/Lab (4)
  • FN435 Management in Dietetics Practice (4)
  • FN463 Nutrition Research and Communication Seminar (2)
  • FN490 Capstone in Foods and Nutrition (1)
  • FN500 Community Nutrition (3)
  • FN501 Medical Nutrition Therapy I (3)
  • FN502 Medical Nutrition Practice I (1)
  • FN503 Medical Nutrition Therapy II (3)
  • FN504 Medical Nutrition Practice II (1)
  • FN507 Service Learning in Community Nutrition (1)

Total: 53 credits

Related Requirements for the Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration

  • BIO117 Human Physiology w/Lab (4)
  • BIO209 Microbiology w/Lab (4)
  • CHEM121 Introductory Chemistry w/Lab (4)
  • CHEM 123 Introductory Organic Chemistry w/Lab (4)
  • BUS121 Accounting and Finance for Health Care Professionals (4)
  • MATH 119 Elementary Statistics (4)
  • SOC – Sociology Elective (4)
  • PSY – Psychology Elective (4)

Total: 32 credits

Total Core and Related Requirement Credits for the Bachelor in Science in Foods and Nutrition major in the Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration: 85

A grade of "C" or better is required in all major core courses and in the sciences. *FN320 may be taught through the Chemistry program.

The ND Concentration provides the foundational knowledge requirements as defined by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Students who successfully complete degree and ND program requirements receive an ACEND Didactic Program in Dietetics Verification Statement.

General Studies in Foods and Nutrition Concentration Core Requirements

  • FN100 Professional Preparation (1)
  • FN200 Introduction to Food Science w/Lab (4)
  • FN210 Basic Human Nutrition (4)
  • FN235 Methods of Nutrition Education (4)
  • FN300 Food Production Systems w/Lab (4)
  • FN320 Nutritional Biochemistry I (4)*
  • FN323 Nutrition in the Life Cycle (4)
  • FN325 Nutritional Biochemistry II (4)
  • FN400 Professional Practice in Dietetics, Foods and Nutrition (1)
  • FN405 Food Science and Experimental Foods w Lab (4)
  • FN463 Nutrition Research and Communication Seminar (2)
  • FN490 Capstone in Foods and Nutrition (1)
  • FN500 Community Nutrition (3)
  • FN507 Service Learning in Community Nutrition (1)

Total: 41 credits

Related Requirements for the General Studies in Foods and Nutrition Concentration

  • BIO117 Human Physiology w/Lab (4)
  • CHEM121 Introductory Chemistry w/Lab (4)
  • CHEM 123 Introductory Organic Chemistry w/Lab (4)
  • BUS200 Principles of Management and Management Skills (4)
  • BUS121 Accounting and Finance for Health Care Professionals (4)
  • MATH 119 Elementary Statistics (4)
  • SOC – Sociology Elective (4)
  • PSY – Psychology Elective (4)

Total: 32 credits

Total Core and Related-Requirement Credits for the Bachelor in Science in Foods and Nutrition major in the General Studies in Foods and Nutrition Concentration: 73

A grade of "C" or better is required in all major core courses and in the sciences. *FN320 may be taught through the Chemistry program.

FN Program course descriptions can be found under the College's Self-Service system.

Minor in Foods and Nutrition

Students admitted to any of the Foods and Nutrition Minor options must have achieved a "C" or higher in all prerequisite courses, and must achieve a "C" or higher for all courses in the Minor to advance and earn the Minor.

Total: 20 credits

  • FN200 Introduction to Food Science w/Lab (4)
  • FN210 Basic Human Nutrition (4)
  • FN320 Nutritional Biochemistry I* (4)
  • FN325 Nutritional Biochemistry II*(4)
  • FN429 Food Science and Experimental Foods w/Lab (4)

Students completing the Foods and Nutrition Minor must meet prerequisites: *CHEM 121 and 123 (or higher).

Minor in Foods, Nutrition and Community Education

  • FN200 Introduction to Food Science w/Lab (4)
  • FN210 Basic Human Nutrition (4)
  • FN323 Nutrition in the Life Cycle** (4)
  • FN500 Community Nutrition (3)
  • FN507 Service Learning in Community Nutrition (1)

Students must meet prerequisites: **BIO 117 (Optional: CHEM 121 and 123).

Total: 21 credits

Minor in Medical Nutrition for Health Professionals

  • FN210 Basic Human Nutrition (4)
  • FN320 Nutritional Biochemistry I* (4)
  • FN323 Nutrition in the Life Cycle** (4)
  • FN325 Nutritional Biochemistry II*(4)
  • FN501 Medical Nutrition Therapy I (3)
  • FN502 Medical Nutrition Practice I (1) (optional)
  • FN503 Medical Nutrition Therapy II (3)
  • FN504 Medical Nutrition Practice II (1) optional

Students must meet prerequisites: *CHEM 121 and 123 or higher; **BIO 117. Students entering this Minor must have a 3.0 GPA or higher in the sciences, be recommended by their major Program Faculty, and must be approved by the DPD Director. This Minor in Medical Nutrition for Health Professionals is designed specifically for students seeking to become health professionals who have an interest in medical nutrition. Students who intend to apply to medical school should comply with all the science and math requirements for admission. This Minor does not award an ACEND Didactic Program in Dietetics verification statement.

Total 22-24 credits

Minor in Nutritional Science

  • FN210 Basic Human Nutrition (4)
  • FN320 Nutritional Biochemistry I* (4)
  • FN323 Nutrition in the Life Cycle **(4)
  • FN325 Nutritional Biochemistry II*(4)
  • FN463 Nutrition Research and Communication (2)

Students completing the Nutritional Science Minor must meet prerequisites: *CHEM 121 and 123 (or higher); **BIO 117.

Total: 18 credits

Minor in Personal Fitness Training

The Personal Fitness Training minor affords all students the opportunity to incorporate knowledge, skill, attitude, self-awareness, and self-determination while enhancing all aspects of wellness principles. Completion of the minor prepares students for certification as a personal or group fitness trainer.

Total: 18 credits

  • FIT 100 Introduction to the Fitness Industry (2)
  • FIT 200 Strength and Conditioning I (2)
  • FIT 205 Strength and Conditioning II (4)
  • FIT 300 First Aid and Injury Prevention (4)
  • FIT 400 Exercise Physiology (4) (Prerequisite Human Physiology or Anatomy & Physiology)
  • FIT 405 Professional Fitness and Assessment (4)

Fitness Elective

  • FN 671 Sports Nutrition (3)

Combined B.S./M.S. Degree

Eligible undergraduate students can earn a combined B.S./M.S. degree for a total of 141 credits. Students are required to complete a minimum of 120 undergraduate degree credits and 30 graduate-level degree credits of which 9 credits overlap in partial fulfillment of the combined degree requirements. The Bachelor of Science degree will be awarded upon completion of 120 credits, which must meet all CSE Essential general education and Nutrition and Dietetics (ND) Concentration requirements. Students completing the combined degree also fulfill the ACEND Didactic Program in Dietetics Verification requirements. This statement will be issued upon completion of the B.S. Degree requirements.

Students interested in the B.S./M.S. program option, must be a major in Foods and Nutrition ND concentration and meet the program's eligibility criteria.

  • Students must have established junior-level standing, or completion of 76 credits. Generally, this process is met at the beginning of the junior year.
  • Complete the prerequisites to the M.S. in Nutrition program coursework: Human Physiology, Introductory and Organic Chemistry, Nutritional Biochemistry I and II (or the equivalent) and Statistics.
  • Students seeking a first degree through either the Women's College or the Continuing Studies program must show adequate progress towards completion of the CSE Essentials general education program.
  • Hold a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA in both College of Saint Elizabeth and all schools attended.
  • Demonstrate academic achievement in the ND Concentration (minimum of 3.2 GPA in the ND core and sciences), leadership and potential to complete rigorous coursework, to ensure academic success in completion of the M.S. degree requirements.

Students wishing to complete the B.S./M.S. option must apply and be recommended by faculty for formal acceptance. Students wishing to complete this option must do so by no later than September 15 of the senior year. Combined degree students should maintain continuous matriculation. This program is designed for full-time enrollment. Students wishing to complete the program on a part-time basis are advised to plan their program carefully to avoid interruptions in course offerings.

Students in the combined degree complete the following ND Concentration credits for graduate credit transfer: FN 501 Medical Nutrition Therapy I (3 credits), FN 503 Medical Nutrition Therapy II (3 credits) and Community Nutrition (3 credits). Students enrolled in the B.S./M.S. must earn a course grade of "B" or better in all courses taken to remain in the combined degree program.

The nine (9) graduate-level ND Concentration credits may only be applied to the M.S. in Nutrition Program and cannot be applied to another graduate program or the Dietetic Internship.

Second Degree Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration

The second degree option is designed for the student who holds a B.A. or a B.S. degree in a non-related field, and requires a minimum of 32 credits to complete the degree and ND coursework to meet ACEND Didactic Program in Dietetics verification requirements. Students earn a B.S. in Foods and Nutrition.

Interested students must:

  • Apply through the Office of Admission under the Continuing Studies Program/Transfer. Admission requires a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in past college-level studies.
  • Meet the College's requirements for a second degree and enroll as a matriculated student.
  • Complete one four-credit course under the CSE Essentials general education requirements, Element III.
  • Students who have completed their degree requirements outside of the United States must submit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores and an original educational services transcript that states U.S. degree equivalency. On occasion a copy of the foreign degree may be requested.
  • Have a transcript evaluation of all past colleges attended to determine what courses a prospective student must take, and approximately how long it will take the student to complete the degree requirements. Students completing the program on a part-time basis must plan carefully to ensure prerequisites are met.
  • Coursework requirements towards the ND Concentration will be determined on an individual basis, but must meet a minimum of 24 credits towards the major.
  • Please note that only coursework with a grade of "B" or better for the ND Concentration requirements and related courses will be accepted for initial transfer. Nutrition courses completed at another institution must have been completed within the past five years in order to transfer. Nutritional Biochemistry I and II and all courses with specific ACEND Didactic Program in Dietetics student learning outcomes must be completed at the College unless specific permission has been provided by the Didactic Program in Dietetics Director or the FN Program Chair.

Concentration in Entrepreneurial Nutrition Practice

Many lifestyle habits, including poor nutrition habits, contribute to obesity and overweight and other chronic degenerative health problems. The 12-credit Concentration in Entrepreneurial Nutrition Practice prepares students to develop programs and provide counseling to clients with an emphasis on behavior change, health promotion and disease prevention. Courses are designed to help students improve their nutrition education and counseling skills for individuals and groups with an emphasis on health, wellness and weight management. Strategies to design, implement, and evaluate health and nutrition intervention programs are included. The concentration provides training in Weight Management, Integrative Nutrition and Health Therapies, Concepts in Nutrition Counseling, and Program Design and Management in Community Nutrition. This concentration also meets the criteria for continuing education credits, as required for dietetics professionals by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Courses include:

  • FN 630 Interventions and Strategies in Weight Management (3)
  • FN 624 Integrative Nutrition and Health Therapies (3)
  • FN 653 Concepts in Nutrition Counseling (3)
  • FN 677 Program Design and Management in Community Nutrition (3)

Total: 12 credits

Concentration in Community Nutrition and Wellness

This 14-credit Concentration in Community Nutrition and Wellness emphasizes ecological public health strategies and demonstrates how communities can think globally and act locally to improve the public's health. The current status of research on key nutrition issues across the lifespan is examined. The incidence, risks, development, and recommendations for prevention of chronic conditions and diseases are discussed. Courses are designed to prepare students to develop, implement, and evaluate public health programs for various groups. The concentration provides training in Health Promotion and Wellness, Child and Adolescent Nutrition, Nutrition and Aging, Global Food Issues, and Program Design and Management in Community Nutrition.

  • FN 626 Health Promotion and Wellness (3)
  • FN 620 Child and Adolescent Nutrition (2)
  • FN 625 Nutrition and Aging (3)
  • FN 663 Global Food Issues (3)
  • FN 677 Program Design and Management in Community Nutrition (3)

Total: 14 credits

Certificate Program in Sports Nutrition and Wellness*

The 13-credit Certificate Program in Sports Nutrition and Wellness is designed for professionals who have a baccalaureate degree in nutrition, education, coaching, fitness or other health-related field. Prerequisites to the program include anatomy and physiology and introductory nutrition. The Program can be completed part-time and includes courses in Sports Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Kinesiology, Sports Psychology, and Fitness Assessment. The Program prepares students for positions as personal trainers and health and fitness instructors with exercise and nutrition programs in schools, weight management centers, recreational agencies, worksites, health centers, corporations, fitness facilities, and hospitals. Students may contribute to a variety of planning, instructional, and administrative roles in community and corporate health-related facilities. Graduates are encouraged to seek the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Health Fitness Instructor Certification. The Certificate Program may be taken alone or as part of the M.S. in Nutrition Degree Program.* Courses include:

  • FN 510 Exercise Physiology and Kinesiology (4)
  • FN 671 Sports Nutrition for Health and Performance (3)
  • FN 515 Professional Fitness and Training Assessment (3)
  • PSY 663 Sports Psychology (3)

Total: 13 credits

*Master's degree candidates must complete all graduate program prerequisites.

M.S. in Nutrition – Online Program

The 30-credit online graduate program in nutrition combines advanced study in nutrition and health promotion with a unique, competency-based curriculum that provides nutrition and health professionals with a broad perspective of current issues in nutrition research and ethics, health promotion and healthy aging, counseling and communications, and public health and program planning. The Program emphasizes ways to incorporate new research and technology, evidence-based applications, and entrepreneurial skills into the practice of nutrition.

The online Graduate Program in Nutrition at the College of Saint Elizabeth enables students to achieve their educational goals in a convenient, collaborative, and interactive format. Course work is offered through distance learning technology. All core courses and most electives are offered online and it is possible to earn the degree fully online. Some electives and specific courses in the Certificate in Sports Nutrition and Wellness are offered in a traditional campus setting or in an accelerated conference format on campus. Students in the M.S. in Nutrition may choose a concentration in Entrepreneurial Nutrition Practice or Community Nutrition and Wellness or may earn a Certificate in Sports Nutrition and Wellness as part of the degree.

Nutrition professionals develop skills to assume leadership roles in delivering nutrition and wellness-related services in a variety of settings. The Program prepares students for a variety of career opportunities in business, government, health care, and education. Graduates work in private practice, nutrition education, school systems, the food and pharmaceutical industries, clinical and corporate research, community organizations, hospitals, public health agencies, work site wellness and health promotion programs, and fitness facilities.

Program Options

The online Graduate Program in Nutrition offers four options for admission:

Option A: Designed for the Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist (RD/RDN) or student who has recently completed a supervised practice program accredited or approved by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and who has received graduate-level credit for this experience. Students accepted under Option A may be eligible to receive up to nine (9) graduate credit hours towards their M.S. in Nutrition if graduate level courses were completed during their dietetic internship and meet program requirements. Credits must be pre-approved by the graduate program director. Eligible students must submit a copy of their official transcripts, a catalog description, a course outline, and an original ACEND DI verification statement in order to receive transfer credits. In addition, the student may be asked to submit samples of his/her work completed during the supervised program as part of the review process. Courses identified as supervised practice will not be considered for transfer.

Option B: Intended for the person with a baccalaureate degree in foods, nutrition, and/or dietetics or the person with a baccalaureate degree in a non-nutrition area who desires an advanced degree in nutrition. All applicants must have completed the prerequisites for the graduate program in nutrition including: Introductory and organic chemistry, statistics, human physiology, biochemistry, and advanced nutrition (or the equivalent). Note that the Option B pathway does not make a student eligible for a dietetic internship. Students interested in becoming a Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist (RD/RDN) who have an undergraduate degree in a non-nutrition area are advised to pursue the Second Degree Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration.

Option C: Designed for the person with a baccalaureate or Master's degree in nutrition or closely related field who desires an advanced certificate in nutrition with an emphasis in Sports Nutrition and Wellness. This certificate can be completed independently from the Master's degree or combined with the core requirements to be eligible for an M.S. degree in Nutrition.

Option D: Designed for the student seeking a combined M.S. in Nutrition and Dietetic Internship Program. Upon successful completion, the student earns an M.S. in Nutrition and a Verification of Dietetic Internship Completion and is eligible to sit for the National Registration Examination for Dietitians (RD/RDN). To apply to this option, see the Dietetic Internship Application materials at www.cse.edu/di. Applicants to this option must participate in the Dietetic Internship Centralized Application Service (DICAS) and D&D Digital computer matching. See separate Program Admissions and Program Requirements available at www.cse.edu/di.

Additional Admission Criteria for the M.S. in Nutrition Program

An individual seeking direct admission to the graduate program in Nutrition must hold a baccalaureate degree in nutrition, foods, or dietetics from an accredited undergraduate institution. Other individuals with a degree in other areas are encouraged to apply with the understanding that they may be required to take various undergraduate courses as prerequisites to satisfy the admissions criteria. Generally, applicants must have achieved a cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of not less than 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Students who have background and potential for success but whose GPA is less than 3.0 may be admitted to the graduate program on a provisional basis. A maximum of nine graduate credits may be accepted in transfer credit. Transfer of credit into the graduate program will be subject to evaluation and approval by the Director of the Graduate Program in Nutrition. All transfer credits must carry a minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale).

Program Requirements (Minimum of 30 Credits):

Fifteen (15) credit hours in required core courses

  • FN 650 Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism
  • FN 655 Research Methods for Health Care Professionals
  • MC 626 Ethical Issues in Human Services Leadership
  • FN 657 Current Topics in Preventive Nutrition
  • FN 670 Professional Communications Seminar

Twelve (12) credit hours in elective courses drawn from the concentrations or the Certificate in Sports Nutrition and Wellness, or other program-approved elective courses.

  • Entrepreneurial Nutrition Practice Concentration: Includes courses in: Concepts in Nutrition Counseling, Integrative Nutrition and Health Therapies, Interventions and Strategies for Weight Management, and Program Design and Management in Nutrition
  • Community Nutrition and Wellness Concentration: Includes courses in: Introduction to Public Health and Nutrition, Global Food Issues, Child and Adolescent Nutrition, Nutrition and Aging, Program Design and Management in Community Nutrition
  • Sports Nutrition and Wellness Certificate: Includes courses in: Exercise Physiology and Kinesiology, Professional Fitness & Training Assessment, Sports Nutrition for Health & Performance, and Sports Psychology
  • Other Program Electives: Choose from Service Learning in Community Nutrition, Nutrition Research Seminar, Critical Care Nutrition, Food, Society and Spirituality, Women's Nutrition and Health Issues, Nutrition Assessment, Food Security, Pharmacology, Principles of Food Law and Regulation, among others.

Three (3) credit hours in a Capstone Experience (Choose one):

  • FN 695 Capstone Evidence Analysis Portfolio
  • FN 680 Action Research Project
  • FN 699 Thesis
  • FN 6XX Capstone in Supervised Practice in Dietetics (for students in the MS/DI only)

CSE B.S. in Foods and Nutrition Pre-Select Application to the M.S. in Nutrition/Dietetic Internship Program

Students enrolled in the College of Saint Elizabeth B.S. in Foods and Nutrition: Nutrition and Dietetics Concentration may apply for the M.S. in Nutrition/Dietetic Internship (MS/DI) combined program under the pre-selection option. Up to eight of the Combined MS/DI Program's 20 positions may be filled using the pre-select option. Applicants apply in the fall of the senior year and must meet the GPA requirements outlined below at the time of application. Students wishing to apply through this option should contact the Dietetic Internship Director between August 1 and September 1 for forms and instructions. Applications will be due by September 15 and a decision will be rendered by October 1. If accepted, students must accept or decline the position by October 15. Once accepted into the CSE Combined MS/DI Program, the student will NOT be eligible to participate in computer matching for other positions.

To apply through this option students must have:

  • Established Junior-level standing, or completion of 76 credits.
  • Completed Element I and II of the general education requirements at the time of application.
  • Hold a minimum of a 3.5 cumulative GPA in both College of Saint Elizabeth and transfer credits.
  • Have a minimum of a 3.2 cumulative GPA in Foods and Nutrition Major courses.

Students will complete an application form, one letter of recommendation from a faculty, volunteer mentor or employer from outside of the Foods and Nutrition Program as well as written statement (guidelines and forms will be provided). A committee of Foods and Nutrition faculty will make the decision for admission to the MS/DI option or if more than eight qualified students apply, students may be offered a position in the B.S./M.S. only. Students who are admitted to the B.S./M.S. only will receive a Didactic Program in Dietetics Verification Statement and may apply to other Dietetic Internship Programs.

Combined M.S. in Nutrition and Dietetic Internship Program (MS/DI)

The combined M.S. in Nutrition/Dietetic Internship Program (DI) is completed in 38 credits. Accepted students complete 20 hours of online M.S. in Nutrition coursework and 18 credits of Dietetic Internship Program specific coursework that includes a minimum of 1200 hours of supervised practice. Students who successfully complete the program receive a Masters in Nutrition and a Verification Statement of Program Completion. They are then eligible to take the National Examination to become a Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist (RD/RDN). The program offers a concentration in Entrepreneurial Nutrition Practice. To learn more about the Dietetic Internship, visit www.cse.edu/di.

Special Conditions – Didactic Program in Dietetics Verification Statement

The Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) Verification Statement option meets the needs of students who already hold a B.A. or B.S. degree in foods, nutrition, or dietetics, and who wish to complete Didactic Program in Dietetics coursework to meet ACEND DPD verification statement requirements. Upon final completion of coursework, a DPD Verification Statement is issued to the candidate by the DPD Director.

Interested students must:

  • Apply through the Office of Admission.
  • Have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in past college-level studies.
  • Submit all transcripts of past college coursework. Following an evaluation of transcripts, the Program Director will determine what courses a prospective student must take, and approximately how long it will take the student to complete the Certificate requirements. Students who have completed their degree requirements outside of the United States must submit a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score and an original educational services transcript that states U.S. degree equivalency. On occasion a copy of the foreign degree may be requested.
  • Enroll as non-matriculated visiting students. This is not a degree-bearing program.
  • Complete a minimum of 12 credits in DPD core concentration coursework at the College of Saint Elizabeth for the verification statement to be granted. The specific courses that individual students must take will vary according to their past coursework. In some cases students will be required to exceed the minimum 12-credit standard. All professional concentration coursework must be completed at CSE unless otherwise approved by the Didactic Program in Dietetics Director.

Course Listing

Course Level: 1

FIT-100
Introduction to the Fitness Industry
Credit Hours: 2

Students examine current competencies required for credentialing in the field, and a variety of current fitness/wellness practice delivery systems. This course includes a field practicum to enhance the student?s ability to plan, implement, and evaluate fitness/wellness programs for a variety of populations. Marketing issues and business practices will be examined for ethical safety issues.

FN-100
Professional Preparation
Credit Hours: 1

Career opportunities in foods, nutrition and dietetics are introduced. Emphasis is placed on academic and pre-professional preparation. Guest speakers from various areas of professional practice supplement lectures (1 Credit; Grading Pass/Fail; Prerequisites: None).

FIT-105
Golf
Credit Hours: 0.5

The history of golf, the use of woods and irons, stances, terminology, and etiquette balance the practical application of skills. Practical experience indoors and outdoors will be provided. Fitness/Wellness requirement.

FIT-110
Self Defense
Credit Hours: 1

Common practical everyday safety precautions for the individual at home, at work, and while traveling.

FIT-115
Physical Fitness & Weight Training
Credit Hours: 1

Basic anatomical and physiological functions of the body in the context of fitness are the basic foundations of the course. Complete fitness evaluations will be offered in accordance with national guidelines, followed by fitness planning for the individual.

FIT-120
Beginner Swimming
Credit Hours: 1

Basic water adjustment skills, strokes, safety skills, and group activities are the emphasis in this self-paced class taught to insure personal safety and competence.

FIT-125
Water Aerobics
Credit Hours: 2

Strengthening the heart and lungs, and shaping-up the skeletal and muscle systems will be the guidelines for personal water aerobics workouts through explanations and demonstrations. Students do not need to know how to swim. All activity is in shallow water. Options for deep water exercise are available.

FIT-130
Aerobics
Credit Hours: 1

This is a combination of vigorous exercise and callisthenic exercises for toning, firming, and cardiovascular endurance. This also includes dance patterns to teach and reinforce rhythm. Low impact step aerobics will be the primary focus of the course. New aspects to be explored will include cardio, kick boxing, Pilates, strength training, high and low impact.

FIT-135
Lifeguard Training
Credit Hours: 1

Principles of preventative lifeguarding, knowledge and skills of how to prevent accidents from occurring, knowledge of rescue skills, and the ability to perform them. Red Cross has designed a uniform course to provide candidates with the knowledge necessary for competent performance as a professional lifeguard at pools and waterfront areas.

FIT-140
Tennis
Credit Hours: 2

Fundamentals of the game including grips, strokes, scoring, and rules will be presented. Tournaments will be set up to provide experience in a game situation.

FIT-145
Badminton
Credit Hours: 0.5

Grips, strokes, and selection and care of equipment will be presented. Students are able to participate in and gain enjoyment from a recreational activity. Intra class tournaments in singles and doubles will be held. Game strategy is introduced to ensure a more thorough understanding of the game and promote better understanding of a very fast-paced sport.

FIT-150
Fencing
Credit Hours: 1

History, footwork, terminology, safety, various attacks, and defense maneuvers will be offered. Limited competition will be presented.

FIT-155
Aerobic Fitness Wallking
Credit Hours: 0.5

Low impact fitness walking course designed to increase cardiovascular fitness. Participants will take advantage of the numerous trails on and off campus.

FIT-160
Volleyball
Credit Hours: 1

Fundamentals of the game including basic skills, scoring, positioning, rules, terminology, and game strategy will be the aim of this introductory course.

Course Level: 2

FIT-200
Strength & Conditioning I
Credit Hours: 2

This course is designed to provide students with a specific knowledge of anatomy and physiology as it pertains specifically to strength and conditioning. Examination of muscles and their actions will provide the basis for application in exercise.

FN-200
Intro Food Science
Credit Hours: 4

Principles of food science are introduced with an emphasis on the function of ingredients in food systems. Scientific and sensory evaluation techniques are presented. Students are introduced to scientific writing. Includes a required laboratory session (4 Credits; Grading for lab is Pass/Fail; Offered fall semester; Prerequisites: None).

FN-200L
Lab Intro Food Science
Credit Hours: 0

FN-201
Introductory Nutrition*
Credit Hours: 3

An introduction to the science of human nutrition is presented. A study of the essential nutrients, the functions in the body to include digestion, absorption, and metabolism, and the nutritional requirements for the adult is taught. Discussion of the nutrition related to fitness and major health diseases/disorders is included. This course fulfills the general education requirement for science. Satisfies Cluster 3 General Education requirement.

FIT-205
Strength & Conditioning II
Credit Hours: 4

Building on the basic knowledge, students will begin to apply specific principles to exercise and sport specific actions. Students will work to create action plans based on sound theoretical knowledge of anatomy and physiology. The origin, insertion and action of muscles and the complete movement of a sports action will be examined for safe and appropriate application.

FN-210
Basic Human Nutrition
Credit Hours: 4

Students study the essential nutrients, the physiologic processes of digestion, absorption, and metabolism, and the nutritional requirements for the adult. Discussion of nutrition related to fitness and major health diseases/disorders is included. Students gain basic skills in nutritional assessment, computations, nutrient analysis, and meal management concepts for individuals and groups. Critical reading of the literature is introduced (4 Credits; Offered fall and spring semesters, and summer as needed; Prerequisites: None).

FIT-210
Professional First Aid/CPR/AED
Credit Hours: 2

This course provides a combination of the first aid skills necessary for acting as the first link in emergency medical services systems. This course will combine all first aid skills and all CPR-cardio/pulmonary skills for adults, children and infants. The addition of AED, Automatic External Defibrillator component makes the course a complete set of skills. Red Cross certification is available.

FIT-215
Contemporary Issues
Credit Hours: 2

Selected activities will provide a forum for current trends and activities in fitness and wellness. Topics will be selected and based on student interest.

FN-217
World Foods*
Credit Hours: 3

A study of the food habits of the people of the world, including the economic, environmental and cultural influences affecting their nutritional status and their food patterns. Open to all students and fulfills the general education requirement for Interdependent World.

FIT-220
Human Sexuality
Credit Hours: 3

This course explores biological, psychological, sociological, philosophical aspects of human sexuality. Through small group discussions, students personally evaluate the ideas, norms, and moral values concerning sexuality in our society.

FIT-225
Environmental Health
Credit Hours: 3

The environmental issues confronting human kind today are presented in this course. It studies the impact the environment has on health. Areas of study will look at water, air, noise and thermal pollution issues. Additional areas to be examined include the occupational and worker comprehensive health care issues that are regulated by federal agencies. Emergent diseases and projected trends are examined in light of today's global village.

FIT-230
Living with Stress
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the physiological, psychological and emotional impact of stress upon individuals and groups. The definitions currently utilized are examined. The concept of stress is studied with regard to personal and professional life. Self- assessment tests are taken and interpreted. Both the long term and short term effects of stress are discussed. A variety of management and coping techniques are described and utilized by the class. In addition group labs are held where fellow students become a built-in support group as coping skills are developed.

FN-235
Methods of Nutrition Education
Credit Hours: 4

Counseling and learning theories are introduced. Developmental or age-related learning concepts are explored to promote effective nutrition education in a variety of settings. Students increase familiarity with use of appropriate nutrition resources and communicating nutrition science. Focus is placed on student development in the application and skill for the planning, implementation and evaluation of nutrition education programs and materials for diverse audiences. Students complete a nutrition education portfolio which includes a community-based teaching session (4 credits; Offered fall semester; Prerequisite: FN 210 Basic Human Nutrition).

FIT-240
Women's Health
Credit Hours: 3

This course surveys women's health experience in the United States. Issues related to health care treatment, health promotion, and disease prevention specific to women will be presented.

FIT-245
Drug Use & Abuse
Credit Hours: 3

This course explores drug use (alcohol and legal and illegal drugs) in our society from psychological, social, cultural, physiological, technological, and historical perspectives. Discussion will include problems of use, misuse, and abuse in relation to prevention and intervention, as well as the impact on individual, family, and social systems.

FIT-250
Lifestyles for Wellness
Credit Hours: 2

This course will provide the basic knowledge of health and wellness.

Course Level: 3

FN-300
Food Production Systems w/Lab
Credit Hours: 4

FN 300Food Production Systems: Principles and theories of food production and delivery systems, subsystems operations and management of food service; emphasizes Hazardous Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), environmental principles and quality standards. Students complete ServSafe? certification. Includes weekly laboratory/field experience in application of food production systems (4 credits; Offered fall semester; Prerequisites: FN200 Introduction to Food Science, FN 210 Basic Human Nutrition).

FIT-300
First Aid & Injury Prevention
Credit Hours: 4

This course will provide students with the theory and skills to respond to emergencies using skills in First Aid/ CPR/ AED. Additionally the course presents the latest information on prevention, recognition, and evaluation of athletic injuries. Students learn to coordinate appropriate emergency care and understand the need for appropriate preparation for athletes prior to participation in sports and rehabilitation after an injury.

FN-320
Nutritional Biochemistry I
Credit Hours: 4

This course provides an in-depth study of macronutrients and their specific functions in metabolic processes integrating human physiology, biochemistry, genetics and human nutrition (4 Credits; Offered fall semester; Prerequisites: FN 210 Basic Human Nutrition, CHEM 121 Intro to Chemistry, CHEM 123 Intro to Organic Chemistry).

FN-323
Nutrition in the Life Cycle
Credit Hours: 4

An exploration of the nutritional needs and dietary recommendations of people throughout the life cycle from pregnancy to the older adult is presented. Physiological and environmental factors which affect nutritional status are discussed. Case studies are introduced. An exploration of the nutritional needs and dietary recommendations of people throughout the life cycle from pregnancy to the older adult in normal health and under special considerations. Physiological and environmental factors which affect nutritional status are discussed. Major government programs for populations at risk are identified. Case studies are introduced (4 credits; Offered spring semester; Prerequisites: FN 210 Basic Human Nutrition; Co-requisite: BIO 117 Human Physiology).

FN-325
Nutritional BioChemistry II
Credit Hours: 4

This course provides an in-depth study of micronutrients and their specific functions in metabolic processes integrating human physiology, biochemistry, genetics and human nutrition (4 Credits; Offered spring semester; Prerequisites: FN 325 Nutritional Biochemistry I or CHEM325 Biochemistry II )

Course Level: 4

FN-400
Prof Practice Dietetics,Food & Nutrition
Credit Hours: 1

Reviews current professional practice requirements in dietetics and related fields. Provides direction for preparation for career transition? supervised practice, graduate education, or employment. Student Achievement Portfolios are reviewed (1 Credit; Grading Pass/Fail; Offered fall semester; Senior standing).

FIT-400
Excercise Physiology
Credit Hours: 4

This course is the advanced study of anatomy, physiology, and the mechanics of body movement. The course integrates physiological bases of exercise with application to exercising individuals. The effects of exercise on the major physiological systems (cellular, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, pulmonary, renal, body fluids, hormonal) are discussed. Topics include energy expenditure, fuel substrate metabolism, and hydration. Includes laboratory component with practice of techniques for collection of and analyses of physiological data (i.e., basal metabolism, body composition, pulmonary functions, VO2 measurements, strength testing).

FN-405
Food Science &Experimental Foods
Credit Hours: 4

Advanced concepts of food science, food technology, and recipe development are integrated into laboratory work in experimental design and evaluation. Students complete an independent research project. Scientific report writing is emphasized (4 Credits; Offered spring semester; Prerequisite: FN 200 Introduction to Food Science; CHEM 121 Intro to Chemistry and CHEM 123 Intro to Organic Chemistry).

FIT-405
Professional Fitness Assessment
Credit Hours: 4

This course will provide the basic principles of fitness for prospective fitness professionals. Students learn how to develop a personalized fitness program that includes body composition assessment, weight training, stretching, and cardiovascular programs. This course includes hands-on experience in conducting fitness assessments and muscular strength training. Discussion topics include exercise risks and safety issues, among others. Students learn techniques for complete fitness evaluation in accordance with national guidelines and fitness planning methods. Preparation and eligibility for national personal training examinations and certifications are explored. Criteria for the eligibility are examined, along with the continuing education requirements for maintenance of certifications.

FN-405L
Lab:Food Science and Exp Foods
Credit Hours: 0

Lab - Advanced concepts of food science, food technology, and recipe development are integrated into laboratory work in experimental design and evaluation. Students complete an independent research project. Scientific report writing is emphasized. Offered spring semester; Prerequisite: FN 200 Introduction to Food Science; CHEM 121 Intro to Chemistry and CHEM 123 Intro to Organic Chemistry).

FN-435
Management in Dietetics Practice
Credit Hours: 4

An in-depth study of the organization, management and evaluation of dietetic services in health care, schools and entrepreneurial operations. Emphasizes the application of resource management: human, financial, facilities, and quality assurance; examines issues of accreditation, legislative and regulatory. Students develop an independent business plan (4 Credits; Prerequisites: FN 300 Food Production Systems, MATH 119 Statistics and BUS 121 Accounting and Finance for HC Professionals).

FN-463
Nutrition Research Communication Seminar
Credit Hours: 2

Reviews research methodologies. Students gain an understanding in the application and evaluation of research methods (2 Credits; Offered fall semester; Senior standing).

FN-490
Capstone in Food and Nutrition
Credit Hours: 1

Students present an in-depth professional presentation on a selected discipline-related topic and complete a comprehensive examination. Student Achievement Portfolios are finalized (1 Credit; Offered spring semester; Grading Pass with Honors, Pass or Fail; Senior standing).

FIT-491
Independent Study
Credit Hours: 3

FN-491
Independent Study
Credit Hours: 3

Open either semester to senior Foods and Nutrition students with departmental approval. Students must demonstrate initiative in accepting responsibility and cooperation within the department to warrant the necessary extra time for a personal enrichment program. An outline and a time plan will be submitted at the time of requesting faculty approval.

Course Level: 5

FN-500
Community Nutrition
Credit Hours: 3

Principles of community nutrition program planning, assessment, intervention development and evaluation; social, cultural, health and illness concepts are explored. U.S. public health nutrition policies, programs and practices are presented. Students are introduced to public policy advocacy in nutrition (3 Credits; Offered fall semester; Prerequisites: FN 235 Methods of Nutrition Education and FN 323 Nutrition in the Life Cycle; Co-requisite: FN 507 Service Learning in Community Nutrition).

FN-501
Medical Nutr Therapy I
Credit Hours: 3

Examines the etiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and clinical findings of several disease/disorder states. Emphasis is placed on the application of medical nutrition therapy in the management of acute and chronic conditions. Ethical issues and standards of practice are presented. Evidence-analysis research is introduced. Access to the A.N.D. Evidence Analysis Library is required. Taught concurrently with FN 502 (3 Credits; Offered fall semester; Prerequisites: FN 320 Nutritional Biochemistry I and FN 325 Nutritional Biochemistry II; FN 323 Nutrition in the Life Cycle, and Co-requisite: FN 502 Medical Nutrition Practice I).

FN-502
Medical Nutrition Practice I
Credit Hours: 1

Application to the practice of medical nutrition therapy is covered through the use of guided readings, evidence-based practice and case studies to foster critical thinking in clinical care. MN Practice I focuses on the nutrition care process of assessment and diagnosis of nutritional status; basics of meal planning and calculations for nutrition support. Cultural competency in healthcare is integrated. Development of interviewing skills is emphasized. This course is taught concurrently with FN 501 (1 Credit Laboratory; Offered fall semester; Prerequisites: FN 320 Nutritional Biochemistry I and FN 325 Nutritional Biochemistry II; FN 323 Nutrition in the Life Cycle; and Co-requisite: FN 501 Medical Nutrition Therapy I).

FN-503
Medical Nutrition Therapy II
Credit Hours: 3

This course in a continuation of MNT I. Examines the etiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and clinical findings of several disease/disorder states. Emphasis is placed on the application of medical nutrition therapy in the management of acute and chronic conditions. Ethical issues and standards of practice are presented. Evidence-analysis research is integrated. Access to the A.N.D. Evidence Analysis Library is required. Taught concurrently with FN 504 (3 Credits; Offered spring semester; Prerequisite: FN 501 Medical Nutrition Therapy I and FN 502 Medical Nutrition Practice I; Co-requisite: FN 504 Medical Nutrition Practice II).

FN-504
Medical Nutrion Practice II
Credit Hours: 1

A continuation of Medical Nutrition Practice I. Application to the practice of medical nutrition therapy is covered through the use of practice standards, evidence-based practice and case studies to foster critical thinking in clinical care. MN Practice II expands on the nutrition care process with emphasis on nutrition intervention and nutrition care outcomes. Cultural competency in healthcare is integrated. Focus is placed on the development of counseling skills. This course is taught concurrently with FN 503. May involve off campus travel (1 Credit Laboratory; Offered spring semester; Prerequisite: FN 501 Medical Nutrition Therapy I and FN 502 Medical Nutrition Practice I; Co-requisite: FN 503 Medical Nutrition Therapy II).

FN-507
Service Learning in Community Nutrition
Credit Hours: 1

Students apply discipline-related knowledge to a community nutrition setting through a service learning field experience. A service-learning portfolio is developed (1 Credit; offered fall semester; Co-requisite: FN 500 Community Nutrition).

FN-510
Exercise Physiology and Kinesiology
Credit Hours: 4

This course is the study of anatomy, physiology, and the mechanics of body movement. The course integrates physiological bases of exercise with application to exercising individuals. The effects of exercise on the major physiological systems (cellular, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, pulmonary, renal, body fluids, hormonal) are discussed. Topics include energy expenditure, substrate metabolism, and hydration. Includes laboratory component with practice of techniques for collection of and analyses of physiological data (i.e., basal metabolism, body composition, pulmonary functions,VO2 measurements, strength testing).

FN-515
Professional Fitness&Training Assessment
Credit Hours: 3

This course will provide the basic principles of fitness for prospective fitness professionals. Students learn how to develop a personalized fitness program that includes body composition assessment, weight training, stretching, and cardiovascular programs. Includes hands-on experience in conducting fitness assessments and muscular strength training. Discussion topics include exercise risks and safety issues, among others. Students learn techniques for complete fitness evaluation in accordance with national guidelines and fitness planning methods.

FN-525
Concepts in Dietetics Practice
Credit Hours: 1

This course provides an overview of evidence-based theory and practice related to the field of dietetics. Topics include: the Nutrition Care Process with detailed examination of components of nutrition assessment, principles of nutrition diagnosis and documentation, elements of nutrition intervention, nutrition care outcomes domains; introduction to interviewing and counseling techniques; pathophysiology of nutrition-related chronic diseases; and examination of food service management and systems especially as related to Child Nutrition Programs. The learning experience includes interactive role-playing and case studies. Summer assignments are required. This course includes a program orientation providing preparation for supervised practice. Offered Summer 3 only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Program Cohort.

Course Level: 6

FN-601
Supervised Practice in Dietetics I
Credit Hours: 3

Supervised practice in dietetics: clinical dietetics, departmental management, community nutrition, professional development, and concentration area. Supervised practice involves 32 hours on site weekly. Pass/fail only. Offered fall semester only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Program Cohort. Pre-requisites: FN 525; Co-requisites: FN 603.

FN-603
Applied Concepts Clinical Nutr Practice
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides a comprehensive examination of various nutrition-related clinical diagnoses and the rationale for specific medical nutrition therapies, including enteral/parenteral nutrition support; medical food, vitamin and mineral supplements; special accommodations or assistance for feeding and nutrition education with an emphasis on current practice guidelines and the Nutrition Care Process. Course includes lectures and simulated supervised practice component in the form of case studies and field trips. Offered Fall only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Program Cohort. Pre-requisites: (MS in Nutrition Courses); Co-requisites: FN 601 Or FN 611 Monday seminar meets for 14 weeks ? 5 hours a week -35 hours of lecture and 32 of simulated supervised practice

FN-607
Supervised Practice in Dietetics II
Credit Hours: 3

Supervised practice in dietetics continued from FN601. Supervised practice involves 32 hours on site weekly. Pass/fail only. Offered spring semester only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Program Cohort. Pre-requisites:FN 525, FN 603, FN620, FN 601; Co-requisites: FN 617, FN 636, Either FN 632 Or FN 634.

FN-609
Supervised Practice in Dietetics III
Credit Hours: 1

Supervised practice in dietetics continued from FN 607. Offered summer only. Supervised Practice includes 32-40 hours on site weekly.Weekly lecture seminar may be required. Includes a three full time week culminating experience. Pass/fail only. Offered summer only.

FN-611
Part Time Superv'd Prac in Dietetics I
Credit Hours: 2

For the part-time dietetic intern. Supervised practice in dietetics: clinical dietetics, departmental management, community nutrition, professional development, and selected concentration area. Supervised practice involves 24 hours on site weekly. Pass/fail only. Offered fall semester only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Program Cohort. Pre-requisites: FN 525; Co-requisites: FN 603.

FN-614
Applied Concepts in Clinical Nutrition I
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides a comprehensive examination of various nutrition-related clinical diagnoses and the rationale for specific medical nutrition therapies, including enteral/parenteral nutrition support; medical food, vitamin and mineral supplements; special accommodations or assistance for feeding and nutrition education with an emphasis on current practice guidelines and the Nutrition Care Process. Evidenced based case study presentations are included. Offered Fall only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Program Cohort.

FN-615
Part Time Superv'd Pract in Diet II
Credit Hours: 2

For the part-time dietetic intern. Supervised practice in dietetics continued from FN611. Supervised practice involves 24 hours on site weekly. Pass/fail only. Offered spring semester only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Program Cohort. Pre-requisites: FN 525, FN 603, FN620, FN 611, Co-requisites: FN 617, FN 636, FN 634

FN-617
Applied Concepts in Clinical Practice II
Credit Hours: 1

A continuation of FN614 Applied Concepts in Clinical Nutrition Practice I. This course provides a comprehensive examination of advanced nutrition-related clinical diagnoses and the rationale for specific medical nutrition therapies emphasizing nutrition in critical care and weight management using the Nutrition Care Process. Evidence based case study presentations are included. Offered Spring A only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Cohort.

FN-619
Part Time Superv'd Practice in Diet III
Credit Hours: 2

For the part-time dietetic intern. Supervised practice in dietetics continued from FN615. Supervised practice involves 32 hours on site weekly. A full time three week full time culminating experience is included. Pass/Fail only. Offered fall semester only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Program Cohort. Pre-requisites: FN 525, FN 603, FN 620, FN617, FN 636, FN 611, FN 615, FN 634; Co-requisites: FN 632

FN-620
Child/Adolescent Nutrition
Credit Hours: 2

Physiological aspects of normal growth from conception through adolescence with an emphasis on nutritional needs will be covered. Contemporary nutritional interventions for childhood disorders will be reviewed and evaluated using a seminar format. (Offered Winter Interim Session, Required for Dietetic Interns) Offered Spring B Session, Required for Dietetic Interns

FN-621
Nutrition Research Seminar
Credit Hours: 1

Emerging topics of interest in nutrition will be identified and presented in seminar format by the students participating in this course. Students may repeat this class for a total of 2 elective credits.

FN-622
Critical Care Nutrition
Credit Hours: 2

This course provides an overview of the path physiological background of critical illness and the rationale for specific types of nutritional management. The history of enteral and parenteral nutrition is presented. Emphasis is placed on reviewing the principles of nutrition assessment; the biochemistry of stress and starvation; types of enteral and parenteral feedings; access for nutrition support; and the initiation, advancement, and discontinuation of nutrition support. This course integrates concepts of biochemistry, physiology, and nutrition to develop a theoretical base for application of nutritional care during situations of normal or abnormal fuel utilization in patients who require alternative feeding methods. Other topics include the use of specialized enteral products; patient monitoring, evaluation, and management; home nutrition support; and the professional issues associated with the use of nutrition support.

MCFN-622
Nutrition Applic of Psych/Social Issues
Credit Hours: 3

Strategies for and skills in counseling the individual client or the group are developed. Cross-cultural counseling and cultural competence are discussed. Concepts such as motivation, behavior change and leadership as they apply to the nutrition professional are presented. Utilizes focus group techniques in needs assessment and program planning. Students explore the implications of sociological changes and their impact on the delivery of nutrition services from different perspectives such as public policy planning, entrepreneurship, and the administration of community-based nutrition programs.

FN-623
Food,Society & Spirituality
Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces the major thinkers and trends regarding food, society and spirituality. The course examines current research and thinking regarding the role of food, nutrition, and health across cultures, generations, and religions. Discussions of topics such as the role of spirituality in physical and emotional health, alternative futures of food systems, the slow food movement, diet-free living, and the effects of food on one?s spiritual and physical well being are presented in a seminar format.

FN-624
Integrative Nutrition & Hlth Therapies
Credit Hours: 3

An introduction to complementary and alternative medicine and the current status of research on key alternative medical therapies. The development, philosophy, and treatment approaches of key alternative medical practices are reviewed, including: Mind/Body Interventions, Alternative Systems of Medical Practice, Manual Healing, and Herbal Medicine. The effectiveness of herbal therapies, nutrient supplementation, and the use of nutraceuticals/functional foods in the prevention and treatment of disease will be investigated.

FN-625
Nutrition & Aging
Credit Hours: 2

An overview of nutrition and health-related issues for older adults. Examination of the current status of research on key geriatric nutrition issues is included. The incidence, risks, development, and recommendations for prevention of chronic conditions and diseases of the elderly are discussed. The effectiveness of various treatment modalities including dietary intervention, nutrient supplementation, pharmaceuticals, and the use of alternative therapies in the prevention and treatment of these conditions are investigated using seminar format. Current consumer and health professional resources for the geriatric population are evaluated.

FN-626
Intro to Public Hlth Nutr and Wellness
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides a conceptual overview of the role of health promotion and wellness in contemporary health care. Emphasis will be placed on the manager?s role, responsibilities and involvement in developing, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs. Topics covered include an introduction to health behavior theory, individual and community health needs assessment, and the application of grantsmanship and evaluation techniques to health promotion.

FN-627
Women's Nutrition & Health
Credit Hours: 2

An overview of nutrition and health-related issues for women at all stages of the life cycle. Examination of the current status of research on key nutrition issues for women is included. The incidence, risks, development, and recommendations for prevention of chronic conditions and diseases of women are discussed. The effectiveness of various treatment modalities including dietary intervention, nutrient supplementation, pharmaceuticals, and the use of alternative therapies in the prevention and treatment of these conditions are investigated using a seminar format. Current consumer and health professional resources for women?s health issues are evaluated.

FN-629
Nutrition Assessment
Credit Hours: 2

Application to the practice of nutritional assessment is covered including anthropometrics, biochemistry, and chemical assessment techniques for adults and children. Principles of interviewing and nutrition counseling are presented. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 2 hours.

FN-630
Interventions and Strat for Weight Mgt
Credit Hours: 3

Issues in weight management and obesity in children and adults will be investigated and for normal individuals and those with eating and metabolic disorders will be investigated and discussed using a seminar/workshop format. Principles of weight management including epidemiology, etiology, nutritional, behavioral, surgical, and pharmaceutical interventions will be reviewed. Diagnostic Criteria for the major eating disorders will be emphasized so that students have the ability to distinguish individuals at risk. Etiology, treatment and prognosis of the disorders will also be addressed.

FN-631
Food Security
Credit Hours: 2

An in-depth exploration of causes and policy issues related to food security in the United States and in developing countries. Consideration of the global food system, food aid, and the roles of USAID, the World Bank, and voluntary agencies in meeting the nutritional needs of the world?s low-income, food deficit countries will be given. The U.S. government food-related programs will be investigated and critical analysis of these food assistance programs will be presented using a seminar format.

FN-632
Appld Concpts in Nutr Edu and Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the role of dietetics practitioners in promoting general health and wellness for individuals and groups in a community setting. Application of key theoretical models of behavior change and evidence-based intervention strategies is explored. Strategies for and skills in counseling the individual client and group are examined and applied. Additional topics include principles of developing, implementing, and evaluating community nutrition programs; nutrition health education models; and cultural competence. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Cohort; Offered both semesters. Pre-requisites: FN 525, FN 603, FN620, FN 617, FN 601, Or FN 611; Co-requisites: FN 607 or FN 619.

FN-634
Appd Cnpt in Food and Nutr Bus and Comm
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the role of dietetics practitioners in promoting general health and wellness for individuals and groups through social marketing using media formats such as television, radio and print. Emphasis is place on the communication of evidenced based practice guidelines to consumers in a retail environment. Additional topics include the application of nutrition labeling regulatory compliance. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Cohort; offered Spring only. Pre-requisites: FN 525, FN 603, FN620, FN 617, FN 601 Or FN 611; Co-requisites: FN 607 OR FN 615.

FN-635
Concepts in Pharmacology
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides a study of the basic principles of pharmacology, including major drug classes and their common uses, drug distribution, side effects, drug-drug interactions and drug nutrient interactions. This course is designed to give the nutritionist an understanding of drug effects and the consequences of system alterations and its effects on drug action. Prerequisites: Biochemistry and Human Physiology

FN-636
Concepts in Community Nutr Dietetics Res
Credit Hours: 1

This course includes implementation of a community nutrition proposal and a community service project to fulfill 96 supervised practice hours. Offered Spring B only. Restricted to Dietetic Internship Cohort. Pre-requisites: FN 603, FN 620, FN 617, FN 601 Or FN 611, FN 677 Program Design & Management in Nutrition; Co-requisites: FN 607 OR FN 615.

FN-638
Appld Concpts in Comm Nutr Programming
Credit Hours: 0

This course includes deisgn and implementation of a community nutrition proposal to fulfill 64 to 96 hours of supervised practice hours. Offered Spring B only

MCFN-638
Nutrition Applic of Tech/Ethical Issues
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides students with an overview of important nutrition-related technological and ethical issues in a seminar format. Critical examination and evaluation of current professional and layperson literature concerning such topics as genetics, biotechnology, supplements, and nutraceuticals, among others. Students gain experience using a variety of technologies to gather or deliver nutrition information/education. Readings, case studies, and discussions are used to facilitate development of ethical decision making related to nutrition services. Students explore the different professional codes of ethics for allied health professionals.

FN-639
Appld Cncpts in Food & Nutrtn Prof Comm
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the role of the dietetics practitioners in promoting general health and wellness for individuals and groups through social marketing using media formats such as television, radio and print. Emphasis is placed on the communication of evidenced based practice guidelines to consumers in a retail environment. Professional communication is included in the form of a case study presentation. Additional topics include the application of nutrition labeling regulatory compliance. Includes supervised practice. Restricted to the Dietetic Internship Cohort.

FN-650
Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an in-depth study of current knowledge/literature of the regulation of protein, carbohydrate, lipid, and micronutrient metabolism in health and disease. Includes advanced study of digestion and absorption; transport and utilization; nutrient structure /function relationships; and the integration and regulation of macronutrient and micronutrient metabolism. Pharmacology; immunology; and related applications are included. The course provides a case-oriented application of human metabolism to understanding health-related problems. Current issues/literature related to the micronutrients, phytochemicals, and nutraceuticals in relation to health promotion and disease prevention are presented. Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in Biochemistry and Advanced Nutrition.

FN-653
Concepts in Nutrition Counseling
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the role of dietetics practitioners in promoting general health and wellness for individuals and groups in a community setting. Application of key theoretical models of behavior change and evidence-based intervention strategies is explored. Strategies for and skills in counseling the individual client and group are examined and applied. Additional topics include principles of developing, implementing, and evaluating community nutrition programs; nutrition health education models; and cultural competence.

FN-655
Research Methods for Health Profession
Credit Hours: 3

Principles and procedures of research, proposal writing, planning and design, methodology, and statistical analysis of research conducted in the area of human, clinical, and community nutrition. Grant writing is presented. Students gain practical application of research techniques, project management, and the evaluation of published research. Students are required to write a proposal for a research project. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in Statistics.

FN-657
Current Topics in Preventive Nutrition
Credit Hours: 3

A critical review of the professional literature on obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and osteoporosis, and discussion of its application to professional practice. Prerequisites: Completion of FN 650 (Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism) and FN 655 (Research Methods)

FN-663
Global Food Issues Lessons in Film
Credit Hours: 3

In this course students will explore connections in the food system among food, agriculture, the environment, and public health, considering factors such as economics, population, and equity. Students will gain a systems perspective on current problems related to global food issues and health through the study of recent films/documentaries. Students think critically using a systems orientation about the relationship between the food supply and public health, as well as alternative approaches to achieving both local and global food security. Emphasis will be placed on the sustainability of the current system, the external costs of food choices, and the role of nutrition professionals and consumers in sustaining a healthful global food supply.

FN-665
Food Laws and Regulations
Credit Hours: 3

The course will focus on the basic principles of food laws and regulation with emphasis on nutrient labeling, health claims and federal agencies.

FN-670
Professional Communications Seminar
Credit Hours: 3

Course includes guided practice in writing for a variety of audiences and formats, including social media. Students learn to present their work as evidence-based arguments and to revise it for organization, clarity, and flow.

FN-671
Sports Nutrition for Hlth & Performance
Credit Hours: 3

The course develops the student?s understanding of the benefits and components of fitness and how nutrition impacts health and physical performance. The student will gain an understanding of the energy systems, fuels, and nutrients required to optimally support physical performance across the lifespan. Other topics covered include: national health promotion goals and recommendations, weight management, eating disorders, dietary supplements and ergogenic aids, sports nutrition quackery, meal selections for pre- and post-competition and training, and current research in performance nutrition.

FN-677
Program Design & Mgt in Community Nutr
Credit Hours: 3

Study of the management and delivery of nutrition services in the community. Assists the student in program planning, including needs assessment, interpretation of the mission statement, goal setting, establishing objectives, program implementation and evaluation to measure outcomes. Principles of program administration are included: marketing, budget and fiscal management. Discusses issues and problems influencing delivery of nutritional care: access, resources, urbanization, socioeconomics, and health values. Case studies are utilized and strategies to improve/extend nutrition care in the human services model are presented. Examines nutrition and health education models to design educational and community-based programs. A project is required.

FN-680
Action Research Proj Food and Hlth Lit
Credit Hours: 3

The development of a nutrition project in accordance with current nutrition research. Action Research projects integrate service learning in practice and match specific intervention strategies to audience/facility needs and project outcomes. (Prerequisites: FN 655)

FN-683
Special Topics
Credit Hours: 3

An in-depth exploration of a specific topic that is of current interest to graduate students in nutrition. Approval of the Program Director is required to register.

FN-685
Independent Study
Credit Hours: 3

This course involves independent study or practice in areas relative to the field of nutrition and of individual special interest. The student and faculty advisor develop appropriate goals for the project that is then presented in a formal proposal. This course may require the preparation of a final paper and presentation. May be taken for 1 - 3 credits.

FN-694
CapstoneSupervised Pract in Dietetics
Credit Hours: 1

This course includes development of a Capstone portfolio. This is a document that demonstrates teh acquisition of the student's knowledge and skills. It includes a collection of projects completed during supervised practice along iwth a reflection statement and draft professional developoment portfolio.

FN-695
Capstone Evidence Analysis Portfolio
Credit Hours: 3

The Capstone portfolio is a document that demonstrates the acquisition of the student?s knowledge and skills and can include a collection of projects compiled to demonstrate the student?s proficiency in nutrition. Requires faculty advisement and approval regarding organization and topic for Evidence Analysis component of the portfolio. A formal written and oral presentation of the capstone portfolio is required.

FN-699
Thesis
Credit Hours: 3

An exploration of an area or special research topic of current interest in nutrition. This thesis option provides for an individually initiated research project carried out under the direction of a faculty sponsor. This option involves acceptance of a research proposal (see FN 655) and independent research. Prerequisite: FN 655. This option is taken in place of FN 695.

Who We Are

Founded in 1899 by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth, the College of Saint Elizabeth has a strong tradition of concern for the poor, for developing leadership in a spirit of service and social responsibility, and a commitment to the promotion of women as full partners in society.

Learn more about the College

Connect with CSE

College of Saint Elizabeth
2 Convent Road
Morristown, NJ 07960-6989
973-290-4000

© 2014 College of Saint Elizabeth
TOP