Search
Main Menu
Additional Menu

Contact Information

Laura Winters, Ph.D.
Chairperson
Professor of English

Phone: (973) 290-4317
Email: lwinters@cse.edu
Office: Santa Maria Hall - Room 10A

English

Program Overview

The English Program provides its majors with a strong foundation in literary and writing studies, while offering non-English majors the opportunity to improve their writing skills and deepen their understanding of the enjoyment afforded to the informed reader. The work of the major is ideal for growth toward a profession, while also offering opportunities for pleasure and personal growth.

The Bachelor of Arts in English is offered with three concentrations:

  • English Studies
  • Literary Studies
  • Writing Studies

All of the options within the major prepare students to continue their work in graduate and professional schools. Minors in Literary Studies, Writing Studies, Journalism, and English Studies are also available.

Outcomes

Graduates earning the English major will develop the arts of careful reading, critical inquiry, rational discourse, imagination, and clear communication that will enable lifelong learning and success in a variety of careers, to include the ability to:

  • Closely read literary works and other cultural artifacts, paying attention to word choice, style, metaphor, image, and other formal elements.
  • Write effectively in a variety of genres, to include expository, journalistic, and belletristic.
  • Think critically about the critical cultural activities of reading and writing.
  • Place literary works into conversation with each other.
  • Understand literary works in the larger contexts of literary tradition, the trajectory of an author's development, and surrounding cultural influences.
  • Demonstrate theoretical awareness with respect to literary and writing studies.
  • Write clear, concise, coherent prose employing the conventions of Standard American English.
  • Communicate effectively orally; engage effectively in conversations about literary and writing studies.
  • Demonstrate intellectual and/or artistic independence.
  • Demonstrate the information literacy appropriate to literary and writing studies.

Graduates

Because our graduates have learned to read closely, analyze critically, and express themselves cogently, they are prepared to enter a career as well as to enroll in graduate or professional schools. The English major is an unparalleled preparation for law school, and several of our graduates are practicing attorneys. Others teach in elementary, middle, and high schools, and some teach on college faculties.

Recent graduates work at major publishers. Several others fulfill editorial responsibilities at magazines and newspapers. Many of our graduates work in corporate communication and advertising, and some work in financial services companies.

Students are encouraged to continue their education by enrolling in graduate programs, and in recent years, such schools as Montclair State University, Rutgers University, University of Rochester, New York University, Drew University, Marquette University, Fordham University, West Virginia University College of Law, and Columbia University have welcomed our graduates to their classrooms.

Requirements

B.A. in English

English Studies Concentration

  • 200 American English Grammar (4)
  • 201 The Craft of Writing (4)
  • 220 The English Symposium (2) (.5 credit course, taken four times)
  • 2-- Writing, Literature, Film or Communication (3 or 4) or
  • 265 Studies in American Literature
  • 270 Guided Reading or
  • 273 Guided Writing (2)
  • 327 Independent Reading or
  • 345 Independent Writing (2)
  • 3-- Writing, Literature, or Communication (3 or 4)
  • 411 Capstone Seminar (2)
  • 495 Professional Internship (2)

Total: 28-30 credits

Related Requirement

  • COMM223 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (3)

Total: 31-33 credits

Literary Studies Concentration

  • 201 the Craft of Writing (2)
  • 220 The English Symposium (2) (.5 credit course, taken four times)
  • 247 Critical Reading (4)
  • 270 Guided Reading (2)
  • 327 Independent Reading (2)
  • 300 Seminar in Major Literary Figures (4)
  • 310 Seminar in Literary Tradition (4)
  • 315 Seminar in Literature and Cultural Context (4)
  • 400 Seminar in Literary Theory or
  • 405 Seminar in Rhetorical Theory (4)
  • 411 Capstone Seminar (2)
  • 495 Professional Internship* (2)

Total: 34 credits

*Student teachers may substitute ED 467: Student Teaching for this requirement.

Writing Studies Concentration

  • 201 The Craft of Writing (4)
  • 220 The English Symposium (2) (.5 credit course, taken four times)
  • 247 Critical Reading (4)

Two courses from the following three:

  • 203 Creating Writing (4)
  • 204 Writing for the Workplace (4)
  • 205 Journalistic Writing (4)
  • 270 Guided Reading (2)
  • 273 Guided Writing (2)
  • 345 Independent Writing (2)
  • 320 Advanced Seminar in Writing (2)
  • 400 Seminar in Literary Theory or
  • 405 Seminar in Rhetorical Theory (4)
  • 411 Capstone Seminar (2)
  • 495 Professional Internship* (2)

Total: 34 credits

*Student teachers may substitute ED 467: Student Teaching for this requirement.

English majors with a concentration in writing studies who are seeking a minor in secondary education are strongly urged to take Eng 327 and to use that course, Eng 230, and elective credits to provide themselves with a solid foundation in the literature they will be expected to teach after graduation.

Minor in English Studies

  • ENG201 The Craft of Writing (4)
  • ENG2-- Writing Elective (4)
  • ENG239 Women's Literature: A Difference Voice or
  • ENG247 Critical Reading (4) or
  • ENG265 Studies in American Literature
  • ENG270 Guided Reading or
  • ENG273 Guided Writing (2)
  • ENG3-- Literature Elective (4) or
  • ENG320 Advanced Seminar in Writing (2) and
  • ENG345 Independent Writing (2)

Total: 18 credits

Minor in Journalism

Students will complete a minimum of 18 credits chosen with advisement. At least three credits of the 18 must be some form of practicum, which must be approved by the journalism advisor.

  • ENG205 Journalistic Writing (4)
  • COMM219 Mass Media (3)
  • ENG208 Reporting Practicum (3)
    (may be taken up to 8 credits) (0 - 4)

Choose at least three of the following:

  • ART119 Intro to Photography (3)
  • ART121 Intro to Advertising and Graphic Design (3)
  • ART131 Intro to Computer Graphic Design (3)
  • COMM/CIS231 Desktop Publishing and Computer Graphics (3)
  • COMM261 Television Production (3)
  • COMM361 Public Relations (3)
  • COMM367 Publishing on the Web
  • ENG495 Professional Internship (3)

Total: 18 credits

Minor in Literary Studies

  • ENG201 The Craft of Writing (4)
  • ENG2-- Film (4)
  • ENG247 Critical Reading (4)
  • ENG270 Guided Reading (2)
  • ENG3-- Literature Elective (4)

Total: 18 credits

Minor in Writing Studies

  • ENG201 The Craft of Writing (4)
  • ENG2-- Writing Elective (4)
  • ENG247 Critical Reading (4)
  • ENG273 Guided Writing (2)
  • ENG320 Advanced Seminar in Writing (2)
  • ENG345 Independent Writing (2)

Total: 18 credits

Course Listing

Course Level: 0

ENG-091
Learning Strategies
Credit Hours: 2

An introduction to a variety of principles, techniques, and tools that can assist students through the learning process as they encounter complex college reading material and course work. Topics include critical reading and analysis, note-taking, effective listening, test-taking, time and priority management, and creation of an organized learning plan. Grade and credits not applied toward graduation; institutional credits will be awarded.

ESL-095
Writing/Reading Skills for Int'l Student
Credit Hours: 3

Students are introduced to the writing process and practice writing beginning at the paragraph level leading up to short essays. At the same time, they increase their reading fluency as they read and analyze numerous short articles and stories. Grade and credits not applied toward graduation; institutional credits will be awarded.

Course Level: 1

ESL-100
American Classroom
Credit Hours: 1

This seminar is designed to help new international students become familiar and comfortable with American culture, both in and out of the classroom. Through reading, discussion, and role play, students will learn behaviors that will enable them to function smoothly and successfully in their college courses and in the larger world outside the classroom.

ESL-101
Writing/Reading for Int'l Students I
Credit Hours: 4

An introduction to and practice in the steps in the writing process leading to at least a minimum level of acceptability for college writing. Students practice the fundamental reading skills necessary for success in other college courses: recognizing the main idea in non-fiction and understanding how it is supported, expressing and supporting reactions to the reading, and answering various kinds of test questions. Open only to non-native speakers. Lecture: 3 hours; laboratory: 1 hour.

ESL-102
Excursions in English
Credit Hours: 3

A course concentrating on English structure for those students who need to strengthen their knowledge of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. There will be discussion with some reading and writing. Open only to non-native speakers. Lecture: 3 hours.

ESL-103
Writing/Reading for Int'l Students II
Credit Hours: 3

Continued practice in a process approach leading to a standard of writing acceptable in college courses. Students will read and respond to essays both orally and in writing. They will also practice writing, revising, and editing various kinds of essays. Instruction in word processing is included in the course. Open only to non-native speakers. Lecture: 3 hours; laboratory: 1 hour.

ESL-103L
Lab:Writ/Rd Int II
Credit Hours: 1

ESL-104
Excursions in English II
Credit Hours: 3

A continuation of English 102 which offers intensive work in grammar/vocabulary. Open only to non-native speakers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ESL-105
Writing/Reading for Int'l Students III
Credit Hours: 3

Continued practice of writing skills designed to enable students to enter ENG 111 on a level footing with other students. Students will work on reaching a higher level of maturity in the content of their writing, on reaching a more sophisticated level of language use, and on making more effective use of organizational strategies. Open only to non-native speakers.

ENG-107
Basic Writing
Credit Hours: 4

Guided practice in writing non-fiction prose, affording students opportunities to develop syntactic fluency and to grow more confident in their writing abilities. Writers will conference extensively with their instructor. This course is not open to students who have completed or who are enrolled in ENG 111, ENG 115, or any 200-, 300-, or 400-level writing course. Any student who has not successfully completed ENG 111 may elect to take ENG 107, but some students will be required to take ENG 107 as a result of their performance on their initial writing assessment. (Fall and spring)

ENG-111
English Composition I
Credit Hours: 4

Practice in writing various kinds of prose with emphasis on the process of composing. Attention is given to methods of invention and arrangement and to the importance of revision as a means of shaping and refining ideas. Writers will conference extensively with their instructor. This course is not open to students who have completed or who are enrolled in ENG 115, or any 200-, 300-, or 400-level writing course. (Fall and spring)

ENG-115
English Composition II
Credit Hours: 4

Further practice in prose writing incorporating components and methods of research in the disciplines, with special attention to the student's possible choice of major. Students will practice locating, evaluating, and synthesizing material from sources - both traditional and electronic - ultimately producing research projects adhering to the discourse rules of their disciplines. Writers will conference extensively with their instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 111. (Fall and spring)

ENG-120
The Reading Life*
Credit Hours: 2

Educated people through the ages have appreciated the importance of a rich and varied reading life. This course seeks to deepen and broaden readers' experience with texts, both classic and contemporary, while cultivating the skills necessary for complex thought, critical judgment, and a habit of lifelong reading. A major focus will be the ways that literature can help readers to understand their own experience and cultural assumptions. Includes required attendance at guest author readings. Satisfies Cluster 1 General Education requirement.

Course Level: 2

ENG-200
American English Grammar*
Credit Hours: 4

A study of the grammars of American English, including attention to the structural, transformational, and functional approaches, with emphasis on current usage and the Language of Wider Communication. Satisfies additional Cluster 1 General Education Requirement (not literature).

ENG-201
The Craft of Writing
Credit Hours: 4

Further practice in writing non-fiction prose, with emphasis on elements of style, arrangement, voice, coherence, and clarity. The course affords the competent writer the opportunity to refine technique and style and to demonstrate imagination and maturity in the expression of complex ideas. Research techniques will be refined. Required for English majors and minors; open to all. Prerequisite: ENG 115. (Fall)

ENG-202
Fundamentals of Acting
Credit Hours: 2

Students will study the fundamentals of acting, including role and scene analysis, performance skills, improvisation, vocal development, and rehearsal techniques. The course may culminate in public performance. Course may be repeated for credit once.

ENG-203
Creative Writing
Credit Hours: 4

An introduction to the practice and pleasure of writing short stories and poems. Emphasis is placed upon using metaphor, resisting clich', trusting the reader, and valuing the revision process. Prerequisite: ENG 115.

ENG-204
Writing for the Workplace
Credit Hours: 4

Guided practice in the forms of writing most often used in business settings. Topics include memoranda, business letters, reports, proposals, and white papers. Particular attention will also be given to electronic document production such as e-mails, slide presentations, blogs, and web pages. Prerequisite: ENG 115.

ENG-205
Journalistic Writing
Credit Hours: 4

Students will learn the foundations of writing for print, broadcast, and new media, to include AP style, lead writing, story design, news gathering, and media law. Prerequisite: ENG 115. ENG 208.

ENG-208
Reporting Practicum
Credit Hours: 1

Students enrolled in this course will refine their skills as professional reporters, news writers, and self-editors by reporting and writing articles for campus news publications, principally the student newspaper. Prerequisite: Sophomore status and successful completion of a 200-level writing course, preferably ENG 205. Course may be repeated, and students may earn up to eight credits towards graduation. May be taken for 0,1, 2, 3, or 4 credits. (Fall and spring)

ENG-209
Women in Film*
Credit Hours: 4

An examination of women's distinctive contribution to film history. The student will study women as the object of both the male and the female gaze. Special attention will be given to women directors and producers. Satisfies additional Cluster 1 General Education Requirement (not literature) or Cluster 5 General Education Requirement.

ENG-210
Play Production
Credit Hours: 4

A general course including a survey of the problems of play production from the viewpoint of the director, the actor, the designer, and the stage technician. Students are required to work in some capacity in presenting the semester's play. Variable credit, students can register 0-4 credits.

ENG-220
The English Symposium
Credit Hours: 0.5

Students will discuss and debate current issues in language, literature, and writing with the English faculty at regularly scheduled symposia (generally four a semester). Prior reading and active participation are required. Must be taken four times for the English major, normally as a sophomore and a junior. Pre- or co-requisites: English 115 and 120. Open only to English majors.

ENG-225
Research Writing in Nursing
Credit Hours: 3

Practice in critical writing incorporating components and methods of research in the field of nursing. Activities include searching health care-specific data bases, locating and evaluating discipline-specific articles and books, and analyzing and synthesizing material from these sources. A research paper is a major component of the course. APA research design and documentation forma will be stressed. Prerequisite: ENG 111.

ENG-228
American Film*
Credit Hours: 4

The study of the history of American film, focusing on classic films, conventions of film genres, exploration of director's careers, and definitions of what it is to be an American. Satisfies additional Cluster 1 General Education Requirement (not literature).

ENG-229
International Film*
Credit Hours: 4

Exploration of classic and contemporary films from around the world. Pace, image, and cultural representation will be considered. Satisfies additional Cluster 1 General Education Requirement (not literature) or Cluster 5 General Education Requirement.

ENG-239
Women's Literature:A Different Voice*
Credit Hours: 4

An examination of how women's lives have shaped women's creative expression and an introduction to the female literary tradition-its history, styles, themes, and structures of writing. It includes literary selections by women authors from a variety of cultures. Satisfies Cluster 5 General Education Requirement.

ENG-247
Critical Reading
Credit Hours: 4

A setting where students can engage the literary texts they encounter as they develop the foundational skills necessary for subsequent literary study, including close reading, literary research, and familiarity with critical vocabulary. Opportunities will abound for practice in writing critical essays on the fiction, poetry, and drama under consideration. Required for English majors and minors; open to all.

ENG-250
European Literature & Related Arts I*
Credit Hours: 4

A survey of works of literature produced in Europe from Antiquity through the Seventeenth Century. Some attention will be given to contemporary works of art and music as they relate to the literature. Includes a trip to a museum or a live performance. Open only to honors students. (every other fall)

ENG-253
European Literature & Related Arts II*
Credit Hours: 4

A survey of works of literature produced in Europe from the eighteenth through the twenty-first centuries. Some attention will be given to contemporary works of art and music as they relate to literature. Includes a trip to a museum or a live performance. Open only to honors students. (every other fall)

ENG-257
HONORS Post Modern Seminar
Credit Hours: 4

This seminar will employ an interdisciplinary approach to explore the definitions and manifestations of post modernity. This course will integrate psychology, sociology, philosophy, theology, film and visual art concepts into the discussion.

ENG-263
Greek & Roman Mythology*
Credit Hours: 3

A study of Greek and Roman mythology: the basic meaning of myth and its nature and function in classical cultures will be explored. The major myths and legends will be discussed using primary sources. References will be made to the use of myth in art and literature. Satisfies Cluster 1 or Cluster 5 General Education Requirement

ENG-265
Studies in American Lit
Credit Hours: 4

An exploration of the literature of the United States, with special attention to the literary forms and movements of the last two-and-a-half centuries and an emphasis on the varieties of the American identity.

ENG-270
Guided Reading
Credit Hours: 2

An opportunity for the reader to choose a topic or genre from a list provided by the Department and to become a part of a small community of readers under the mentorship of a faculty member. Students who are seeking a minor in secondary education will be advised to focus on works they are likely to teach after graduation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: English 115 and 247.

ENG-273
Guided Writing
Credit Hours: 2

An opportunity for the writer to choose a topic or genre for reading and writing from a list provided by the Department and to become a part of a small community of writers under the mentorship of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: English 115 and 247.

Course Level: 3

ENG-300
Seminar in Major Literary Figures
Credit Hours: 4

Students will spend time getting to know a single author (e.g., Chaucer, Shakespeare, Austen, Faulkner, or Morrison) or a group of authors (e.g., Thoreau and Emerson, Wordsworth and Coleridge, Eliot and Dickens, the Bloomsbury Group, or Churchill and Parks). Attention will be given to the literary biographies of the writers, the works they have produced, and the context out of which their work has grown. Reading of critical texts and writing of critical papers will be required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: English 115 and 247.

ENG-310
Seminar in Literary Tradition
Credit Hours: 4

Students will examine the ways that literary texts combine to form a tradition. Issues and problems of what constitutes a literary tradition will be foregrounded: What gives a tradition impetus? What causes it to end? How do texts converse with each other within a tradition? The focus will vary each time the course is offered, but it may be such areas as magical realism, theater of the absurd, Arthurian romance, the Victorian novel, or contemporary poetry. Reading of critical texts and writing of critical papers will be required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: English 115 and 247.

ENG-315
Seminar in Lit and Cultural Context
Credit Hours: 4

Students will examine how literary texts reflect and impact their cultural setting. We are born as individuals into a formed world. How does this cultural context limit us and inspire us? How do writers mirror these environmental factors, and how do these factors, in turn, help to inform and alter the writers? Studies of such topics as women and war, the Romantic revolution, the Harlem Renaissance, postcolonial literature, and contemporary Latina writers will explore these questions. Reading of critical texts and writing of critical papers will be required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: English 115 and 247.

ENG-320
Advanced Seminar Writing
Credit Hours: 2

An in-depth study of a particular type of writing, offering writers a chance to refine their skills as they strive to meet the highest standards. The focus will vary, but may include such topics as style, memoir, poetry, nature writing, travel writing, or arts criticism. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: English 201, 240, and an additional 200-level writing course.

ENG-327
Independent Reading
Credit Hours: 2

An opportunity for the reader to develop a reading list and form objectives which will guide an independent reading experience with the goal of deepening and/or broadening an area of interest. Students who are seeking a minor in secondary education are strongly urged to focus on works they are likely to teach after graduation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: English 201, 247, 230, at least one 300- level literature class completed, and at least one 300-level literature class taken concurrently.

ENG-345
Independent Writing
Credit Hours: 2

An opportunity for the writer to develop a reading list and form objectives which will guide an independent writing experience with the goal of producing a publishable piece of writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: English 201, 247, 240, and an additional 200-level writing course.

Course Level: 4

ENG-400
Seminar in Literary Theory
Credit Hours: 4

Students will examine classical and contemporary texts on literary theory and apply them practically to literary works. By exploring fundamental questions about the nature of literary art, the course will help develop students' conceptual understanding of literature and their awareness of the assumptions underlying their own readings. Prerequisite: English 201, 247 and at least one 300-level literature course.

ENG-405
Seminar in Rhetorical Theory
Credit Hours: 4

A survey of rhetorical texts and theories, beginning with the Greek and Roman and ending with modern composition theories. Emphasis will be placed on key terms and concepts, with attention to implications for contemporary roles of rhetoric and writing in modern society. Prerequisites: English 201, 247, and two other English electives.

ENG-411
Capstone Seminar
Credit Hours: 2

An opportunity for students to design and complete an advanced research project. This project may be a substantial expansion of a paper written for another course or it may be a new research topic, but it will always derive from the student's previous work within the major. Research will be completed independently with the guidance of a faculty mentor, and it will culminate in a presentation of each student's work in a formal setting. (Fall)

ENG-491
Independent Study
Credit Hours: 2

An exploration of a topic not covered in departmental offerings. Approval of the department is required before registration. In order to request permission, students must present a preliminary bibliography and a clear idea of the direction of the study. Variable Credit, students can register 1-4 credits.

ENG-495
Internship
Credit Hours: 3

Practice in career-related work such as writing, editing, public relations, and/or translation. A maximum of 3 credits can be applied to the major. Approval of department is required. Variable credit, students can register 1-4 credits.

Course Level: 6

GST-603
Grad Writ Wksp
Credit Hours: 1

GST-605
Graduate Research Writing Seminar
Credit Hours: 3

This course offers guided practice in in advanced techniques of research, analysis, and synthesis, leading to research projects which adhere to the discourse rules of the student's field of study. Includes attention to APA documentation format.

Who We Are

Founded in 1899 by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth, the College of Saint Elizabeth has a strong tradition of concern for the poor, for developing leadership in a spirit of service and social responsibility, and a commitment to the promotion of women as full partners in society.

Learn more about the College

Connect with CSE

College of Saint Elizabeth
2 Convent Road
Morristown, NJ 07960-6989
973-290-4000

© 2014 College of Saint Elizabeth
TOP